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Maryland legislation and CSST


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Why are they singling out yellow CSST for special mention in reports?

Why not single out things that actually matter?

I don't know but they're certainly forcing us into the conversation wouldn't you say? People are going to ask, "whadda ya mean safer? what's not safe about it"?

I have been initiating conversation with clients about CSST on my own for a few years now anyway. This new law says I'm not qualified to determine if its properly bonded. But the forced "bold 14 point" language I'm obligated to use will get people asking questions.

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I guess I just don't understand why it's such a big deal.

Where's the documentation showing lives lost, property damage, failure rate, etc? And how will installing a fatter than customary bonding wire solve this problem?

If the idea is to force inspectors to flag a dangerous condition, why not start with a condition that's actually dangerous - improperly constructed stairs come to mind.

It seems like they're forcing inspectors to focus on gnats instead of lions, tigers, & bears.

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"PROPER BONDING AND GROUNDING OF CSST CAN BE DETERMINED ONLY BY A LICENSED MASTER ELECTRICIAN".

Every time I've had an electrician call me about this issue, they know nothing about this tubing or what the manufacturer requires. Then they (correctly) point out that there is nothing in the NEC about any method of bonding CSST.

This legislation doesn't make sense.

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I'll agree that the legislation does not make sense but if you are in a lightening prone area, it is an important consideration. I have been calling it out for years following the class action lawsuit and settlement to pay for bonding. I don't know how much safer the bonding makes it but the fire marshal that first brought this out appears to believe it is safer with bonding. It used to be outlawed in Frisco but now is allowed as long as it is bonded or has a special high flow valve (which I have never seen) installed. They also require bonding of all metal vents, etc. in the attic. Kind of like creating a lightening rod system.

If you have CSST in a basement or just using it for a branch to extend service it is likely no big deal. If however you build like they do around here with all the furnaces, water heaters, and gas lines stuck two or three stories in the air in the middle of the prairie where we get almost as much lightening as Florida, it can be a big concern. We have had many of the McMansions burn to the ground from a lightening strike that the fire marshal later found the blow torch effect from the ruptured CSST.

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. . . We have had many of the McMansions burn to the ground from a lightening strike that the fire marshal later found the blow torch effect from the ruptured CSST. . .

Any hard numbers on that? I only ask because the last time I tried to pin down actual statistics, I could only find two houses that had burned down as a result of this.

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. . . We have had many of the McMansions burn to the ground from a lightening strike that the fire marshal later found the blow torch effect from the ruptured CSST. . .

Any hard numbers on that? I only ask because the last time I tried to pin down actual statistics, I could only find two houses that had burned down as a result of this.

Some local Fire Marshals are onto it and others are not. I bet checking with them for statistics is a way to begin counting. This document claims "several recent". That's just one county in one state in a relatively short period of time.

http://www.howardcountymd.gov/uploadedF ... 100611.pdf

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. . . We have had many of the McMansions burn to the ground from a lightening strike that the fire marshal later found the blow torch effect from the ruptured CSST. . .

Any hard numbers on that? I only ask because the last time I tried to pin down actual statistics, I could only find two houses that had burned down as a result of this.

No numbers, just bits a pieces of information gleaned over the last few years.

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  • 3 weeks later...

The bill is fruitless, more like a dog and pony show.

In lieu of providing BOLD letter document, why not give the owner a PDF link to the manufacturer cause I am sure this will make the job of the inspector easier, now turn head and cough... Sorry for the rant but this is beyond silly.

Gastite, if you have a group and contact them they will provide a training seminar and the employees who perform the training are well versed.

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I came across this blog and thought that I would weigh in and try to clarify the Maryland HB 1435 bill that was submitted. The bill was meant to try and alert the community that the code had changed and would be a good idea to check their systems. While it was introduced, the bill was not voted on and will not be going into effect.

Also to further clarify some other questions on the topic, the 2009 NFGC & IFGC has language in it that supports the use and proper installation of yellow CSST which includes requirements for direct-bonding and grounding.

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Also in Maryland, a new law effective July 1 - "The new smoke detector law in Maryland requires that all battery only smoke detectors need to have a 10-year lithium battery that is sealed in." Apparently it is being phased in so that all homes have this by 2018 but any home sold after July 1, 2013 has this requirement and it is part of the home owner's disclosure form. As far as I can find, home inspectors requirements for reporting on smoke detectors has not changed.

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Also in Maryland, a new law effective July 1 - "The new smoke detector law in Maryland requires that all battery only smoke detectors need to have a 10-year lithium battery that is sealed in."

The bill that Charlie R. is referring to is MD HB-1413, SB-969.

My read agrees with his that there does not appear to be any changes to Home Inspection reporting, but there are new disclosure statements for sellers.

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