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Lemme Axe You Sumpthin'


Brian G
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I have three questions.

First, due to a brain crap (and disorganized papers) I can't remeber what the average rated life of galvanized steel pipes is supposed to be, and is it the same for supply & drain lines? [:-headach

Second, I've never had occasion to use any PVC glue that was any color other than clear or orange. What is the blue stuff rated for? [:-paperba

Brian G.

Make That Four...Why is There a "b" in Plumbing? [:-boggled[:-dopey][:-mischie

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...average rated life of galvanized steel pipes is supposed to be, and is it the same for supply & drain lines?

In my experience (depending on water quality) anywhere from 45 to 60 years. I've read more than once that it is supposed to be 30 to 50. The kitchen drain always fails first. Drains usually fail from wall loss. Supply pipes usually fail from restricted flow.

What is the blue stuff rated for?

Rapid setting for damp/wet applications. It's usually used for pools and irrigation. I think it's acceptable for all classes and schedules.

Why is There a "b" in Plumbing

Latin- Plumbum, for lead. When indoor plumbing was first introduced, it was all lead. The craft of installing pipes was called "plumbery". "Plumb crazy" we now know is lead poisoning. You can pronounce the "b" if you like. Y'all talk funny down there anyway.

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Originally posted by inspecthistoric

In my experience (depending on water quality) anywhere from 45 to 60 years. I've read more than once that it is supposed to be 30 to 50.

I want to say the literature I have somewhere says 30 - 40, but varies widely depending on a number of factors.

Rapid setting for damp/wet applications. It's usually used for pools and irrigation. I think it's acceptable for all classes and schedules.

Is it okay for hot water lines or relief valve piping? It sounds like "yes", I just want to be sure.

Latin- Plumbum, for lead. When indoor plumbing was first introduced, it was all lead. The craft of installing pipes was called "plumbery". "Plumb crazy" we now know is lead poisoning.

Good Lord, I wasn't really expecting an answer to that one. Kinda fits in with the 'ole "mad hatter" doesn't it (also lead poisoning)? Leave it to Wild Bill Kibbel, fastest historic info in the east.

You can pronounce the "b" if you like. Y'all talk funny down there anyway.

We do talk funny down here, but I've never been anywhere that people pronounced the "b". English is a crazy language. [:-hypnoti

Brian G.

President of the Anti-Silent Letter Society [^]

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Is it okay for hot water lines or relief valve piping? It sounds like "yes", I just want to be sure.

I think it's okay for use on hot water lines. I've seen it on hydro-massage tub tubing. I would think that any pvc solvent would have to meet the ASTM standard.

Good Lord, I wasn't really expecting an answer to that one.

Occasionally, I have to relieve my brain of useless knowledge to make room for new important stuff. Besides, you axed.

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Okay, lemme axe you this one too. I've read about cast iron water pipes being in continuous use for literally hundreds of years (large main pipes, in old European cities). Was it ever common for those to be used in supply systems of houses over here? Ever seen that?

Brian G.

Axer of Lotsa Questions [:-graduat

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After I read about the stuff holding up for hundreds of years (as supply) I couldn't help wondering why it wasn't used in homes. Seems like a logical move for back-in-the-day, but I've never seen or heard of cast iron supply systems in houses. Oh well.

Thanks Bill. [:-angel]

Brian G.

Larnin' Agin' [:-glasses

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Originally posted by Paul MacLean

In Central Texas, I tell'em galvanized and cast iron last about 50 years. Which means in this area they have generally reached the end of their expected life. A warning about the possibility expensive repairs is reported.

Up here, galvanized supply pipes seem to last about 70 years. The hot lines are always the first to go.

Interestingly, we used galvanized pipe right up into the mid 1970s. It'll be interesting to see if the '70s pipe lasts as well at the '30s pipe did.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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I've seen sections of old cast iron main lines that have been removed. For the most part the pipe is still in good condition, but the porous interior is the perfect spot for flora/fauna growth to make a home. The slime inside the sections I've seen was over two inches thick.

I asked a smart guy I know why the chlorine didn't keep down the growth and he said that the chlorine actually causes the organisms to emit a mucous like substance that contributes to the bio film while protecting them from the chlorine.

It was pretty darn gross.

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Originally posted by Chad Fabry

I've seen sections of old cast iron main lines that have been removed. For the most part the pipe is still in good condition, but the porous interior is the perfect spot for flora/fauna growth to make a home. The slime inside the sections I've seen was over two inches thick.

I asked a smart guy I know why the chlorine didn't keep down the growth and he said that the chlorine actually causes the organisms to emit a mucous like substance that contributes to the bio film while protecting them from the chlorine.

It was pretty darn gross.

Interesting...I wonder if that's why my kids blow big ol' snot honkers at the community pool????[:-slug]

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  • 2 weeks later...

Update: While I was in Lowe's today I walked over and checked out the blue glue label (Oatey brand in this case). It's only rated for PVC, nothing else. I guess I'll be writing that up when I see it on CPVC from now on.

Brian G.

Water Heater / Relief Valve & Piping

"When the plumber installed the relief valve piping, he blueid="blue"> it." [:I] [:-paperba

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In our town, galvanized has a limit of use between 40 to 45 years. I agree that we could still find 100 years old galvanized but i am not sure about the water pressure and quality.

Cast iron is about the same age average. I always recommend to make a closer verification to the sewer system by a certified plumber with the help a telescopic camera to verify the intergity of the inside piping and that before the acceptation of the condition of the inspection in the present promise to purchase. ( here an inspection is a condition to buy in a form called promise to purchase) Usually the plumbers find some roots and other growing stuff inside the pipes.

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