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Pier and Beam Foundation Issue


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When I see them I usually call them out as "temporary" and advise that more permanent assemblies be installed.

Yes, I like that he left the box so the jack can be used again under his next house. [:)]

People do what they have to do and get outa there ASAP. Nobody goes back until something breaks or leaks. Life goes on. Of course the new owners don't want that, so we cry foul. [:)]

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Exactly what I stated, "Unprofessional / temporary support was observed at the areas shown in the pictures, Floor joists and / or beams were supported by wood or a jack, simply propped under them. Although no immediate concern was observed, client should contact a qualified contractor for further information and / or evaluation. "

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Exactly what I stated, "Unprofessional / temporary support was observed at the areas shown in the pictures, Floor joists and / or beams were supported by wood or a jack, simply propped under them. Although no immediate concern was observed, client should contact a qualified contractor for further information and / or evaluation. "

Do you talk like that?

Although no immediate concern was observed, client should contact a qualified contractor for further information and / or evaluation. "

I don't understand that. What further information and / or evaluation do they need?

It's wrong. Have a guy with a clue, fix it.

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I'll expose my soft underbelly here- it'd be nice to see how some of the rest of you would actually write this up.

The piers supporting the floor system are a hodge-podge of poorly conceived, poorly built assemblies employing a variety of inappropriate methods and materials. Have a competent trades-person install footings and rated columns to an approved standard or engineered design. Expect to spend low to mid four-figures.

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Sometimes for third person I will say, "My traverse of the crawlspace found..."

--I found a number of what I call temporary supports for the floor system. Some are technically wrong, others are just sloppy. Have a competent contractor replace the temporary assemblies with more permanent ones, including spot footings.--

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"The floor platform and supports have multiple defects, including but not limited to:

1) blah

2) blah blah

3) blah blah blah

4) etc. until the list is finished

These conditions should be repaired. Have a contractor tell you how much. There are a number of repair variables effecting cost, call me at my office to discuss them."

I would have several pictures with red arrows pointing at the issues.

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I used to write like Fabry's comment until my attorney removed my testicles thru my anus for doing it that way.

He also said to tell the client to call me to discuss stuff. Since then, I've had several attorneys tell me it's really smart to do that.

Again, quicker, easier, truth and clarity.

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Several of the piers that support the structural floor system use the wrong materials or products, and are incorrectly installed. If they fail, the floor, ceiling and roof could all sag or otherwise become damaged. Ask a contractor who knows what he's doing to fix them.

Marc

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Kurt and others here, drilled that into my head a long time ago.

It's broke. Have someone else provide an estimate and the best option for correcting the problem.

I don't care how they fix it. I'm not going back to make sure "the competent" you hired to fix it, did it right. It's on them.

I insist on the client being with me during the inspection. What I say to them while we're joined at the hip, is the same thing they see on the report. If someone were to hire me to be impressed by my creative writing skill, they screwed up.

As much of a smartass as I am, I never make snarky comments in a report. In my mind, that is a perfect opportunity to piss off the homeowner and cause a problem that might come back to bite you in the ass.

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I never make snarky comments in a report. In my mind, that is a perfect opportunity to piss off the homeowner and cause a problem that might come back to bite you in the ass.

Agreed. I think it was Allan Carson said don't use the word 'amateur' in your report. The seller may read that and will take offense. Not that we care much, but why stir up trouble?

I never use 'I saw' or 'I observed', wasted words.

Similar to Marc and others:

"In the SW corner of the crawlspace, several floor joists are supported with inadequate posts and jacks. Wood in contact with soil is vulnerable to rot and insect attack. Have a competent contractor install proper posts on concrete pier blocks where needed to prevent sagging of the floor joists".

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Did you use a PS paint brush filter for this picture? It kind of looks like a painting.

The floor framing is poorly reinforced. Basic construction standards have been ignored. Have a qualified carpenter evaluate further and reinforce as necessary. Repairs may (or may not be) extensive.

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I'd like to see Gary's and Tom's actual remarks- and Kurt's too. Write exactly what you would put in the report.

I just checked, worked for 24 attorney referred clients last year coming from 6 different attorneys for a total of 31 inspections. None of the attorneys suggested that my reporting left me susceptible to conflict. What

concerns did your attorney have, Kurt?

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If I can tell why the structure failed I will also put that in the report; rotted lumber, bug damage, poorly built to begin with.

Or sometimes people do things that I don't think was necessary in the first place. I don't believe that is the case here, though.

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The seller may read that and will take offense. Not that we care much, but why stir up trouble?

We should care. We tend to forget this is routine everyday stuff for us. It's a big deal, an unusual event, and a stressful time for both the buyer and the seller. There's a lot at stake for both.

The last thing they need is an inspector insisting on making what's written on the report be more about stroking their own ego than simply reporting facts, and stepping out of the limelight.

You've got the guys who rely on robotic sounding nonsense, or the guys who fancy themselves as great writers. Keep it stupid, simple.

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Here's the actual remark I just put in a report I'm writing right now.

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The top panel in the front entrance door has split to where daylight can be seen through the crack. Have a carpenter repair this to prevent a loss of heat that will result in higher energy costs.

Done deal.

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