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GFCI WHIRLPOOL/HEATER Installation


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I have purchased a whirlpool bath with a heater and need to understand the wiring please.

The installation manual states the information below.

15 AMP DEDICATED

The whirlpool should be installed on a 120 vac,

GFCI circuit.

The circuit should be hard-wired from the electrical power supply panel. The

circuit must be a three (3) wire circuit from the electrical supply panel. A

grounded neutral wire and a third wire, earth ground, are essential.

Optional heater requires a separate 15 amp maximum GFCI circuit

I have a double 15 amp circuit breaker, can I run 1 wire from the circuit breaker to the tub 28ft 12/3 wire, then branch that wire to 2 15amp gfi plugs?

Thanks for any assistance.

Sherryt[:-monkeyd

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I don't see why it wouldn't work.

GFCI devices compare neutral currents to hot wire currents. Discrepancies between the two are taken as an indication of an errant current (perhaps through some unfortunate person), which then causes the device to trip. The presence of a common neutral between the heated tub and the main breaker panel doesn't interfere in that scheme as far as I can tell.

Only problem is that your 'double' 15A breaker needs to have a factory tie between the two handles in this case. If I understand you correctly, that type of breaker is not available with a tie between the handles. You need a regular 240 volt, 15A breaker with the handles tied. The two hot wires will each have 120 volts to neutral.

I'm not sure what you mean by GFCI plugs, unless you mean GFCI extension cords.

Marc

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I don't see why it wouldn't work.

GFCI devices compare neutral currents to hot wire currents. Discrepancies between the two are taken as an indication of an errant current (perhaps through some unfortunate person), which then causes the device to trip. The presence of a common neutral between the heated tub and the main breaker panel doesn't interfere in that scheme as far as I can tell.

Only problem is that your 'double' 15A breaker needs to have a factory tie between the two handles in this case. If I understand you correctly, that type of breaker is not available with a tie between the handles. You need a regular 240 volt, 15A breaker with the handles tied. The two hot wires will each have 120 volts to neutral.

I'm not sure what you mean by GFCI plugs, unless you mean GFCI extension cords.

Marc

I'm confused. Why wouldn't the difference in current between the hot and neutral conductors not trip one or both the GFCIs?

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I don't see why it wouldn't work.

GFCI devices compare neutral currents to hot wire currents. Discrepancies between the two are taken as an indication of an errant current (perhaps through some unfortunate person), which then causes the device to trip. The presence of a common neutral between the heated tub and the main breaker panel doesn't interfere in that scheme as far as I can tell.

Only problem is that your 'double' 15A breaker needs to have a factory tie between the two handles in this case. If I understand you correctly, that type of breaker is not available with a tie between the handles. You need a regular 240 volt, 15A breaker with the handles tied. The two hot wires will each have 120 volts to neutral.

I'm not sure what you mean by GFCI plugs, unless you mean GFCI extension cords.

Marc

I'm confused. Why wouldn't the difference in current between the hot and neutral conductors not trip one or both the GFCIs?

The gfi's are only seeing the current after the split of the mwbc.

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...does not 12 ga. wire need a 20 amp breaker?

The breaker limits the minimum wire size, not the other way around.

You can over size the wire as much as you want as long as it fits in the terminal.

It may not be economically feasible, but it is not prohibited.

Sometimes it is even required when downrating due to heat, or length of conductor.

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