Jump to content

NYC inspector


Chad Fabry
 Share

Recommended Posts

Originally posted by ghentjr

Goose quill.

Many folks don't realize that the profession started around 1955. I am not sure about the left coast but there were inspectors in the Washington, DC area, Philladelphia, New York Metro area, Connecticut and the Boston area. The 13 original charter members of ASHI in 1976 (some say the number was over 30, but that is questionable) were all experienced home inspectors. Tom Byrne 1956, Jack Goldring 1955 (the founder of my company) Claxton Walker, Mel Chalfin, too many names for an old memory. And one thing the old timers had in common was profitability. One of the charter members of ASHI was a woman, PJ Garrity, from Mass. Those were the good ol days.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi John,

Good to see you here and I'm glad you reminded me about Mr. Chalfin. Over the years, he and I have had a few interesting email and telephone conversations and I was telling myself last week that I hadn't heard from him in months and should shoot him an email. Then I plumb forgot all about it. Guess I'll do that now.

He tells me that in the early days folks were dreaming of a future when inspectors would be very well educated in colleges that taught home inspections and building science and that every inspector would one day have to submit to peer review to work in the field. He's more than a little disappointed that the profession has evolved the way it has, but he's still optimistic that it could be turned around if enough folks were willing.

Hope I'm still that idealistic when I reach his age.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by ghentjr

Contact Tom Byrne, tbyrne1029@aol.com. Tom is a charter member of ASHI and presently working as a municipal building inspector.

Tom Lectured at a few ASHI seminars I attended. He is definitely someone you want on your side in a legal case. He knew the answers to every question and did not have to look them up!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"He tells me that in the early days folks were dreaming of a future when inspectors would be very well educated in colleges that taught home inspections and building science and that every inspector would one day have to submit to peer review to work in the field. He's more than a little disappointed that the profession has evolved the way it has, but he's still optimistic that it could be turned around if enough folks were willing."

The dreams of the Fathers. Most who were the pioneer's of this profession thought along the same lines. But I guess when anything becomes heavily populated it is hard to control who moves into the neighborhood. Us old timers thought we could overcome the "trade" thing and keep it a highly professional business. But as I read some of the posts on another forum many coming into the profession have no clue. I am truly surprised that Mel is still active.

True story: Mel recommended me to a client moving into my area. She (the client) happened to be an obsessive/compulsive who admitted that she had to heavily medicate herself to meet me at the inspection. As luck would have it the seller was a paranoid schizophrenic who insisted on staying at home during the inspection. My client was on her knees stroking the lawn to make sure the slope was ok while the seller was freaking out at the picture window. This was just at the start of the inspection and the whole two hours went along those lines. I could never figure out whether Mel liked and trusted me or whether he was getting even for something. If you talk to him say hi for me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

John, after selling your business to the big national company last year, you will find that very little has changed. The company will be profitable, even if it is at the expense of your employees. Doesn't make for happy inspectors.

From what little I know about how the "big national company" is treating my old employees I am not sure that is a problem. I treated them pretty well.

As to profitability, the "old timers" knew what our liability was, what our value was and what the traffic would bear. We had inspection gross averages of close to $200 in the late 70's. I bet many companies today are not much higher - at least not near the changes in the rest of the economy. Realtors still get their 6% but prices have escalated significantly. We charged a percentage of the selling price, (as did many of the old timers) and it allowed us to have built in raises without price increases. Take the old rate of $1.00 per thousand, (1/10th of 1% over a minimum) and apply it to the houses you inspect and see how much more you could be getting without having to explain your fees. We never had to sell our fees, just our abilities.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by ghentjr

. . . As to profitability, the "old timers" knew what our liability was, what our value was and what the traffic would bear. We had inspection gross averages of close to $200 in the late 70's. I bet many companies today are not much higher - at least not near the changes in the rest of the economy. Realtors still get their 6% but prices have escalated significantly. . .

So, you might find this site interesting:

http://www.1soft.com/todaysdollars.htm

It calculates today's dollars from dollars of the past. Just for fun, I entered $200 in 1975. Without looking, does anyone care to guess what it comes out to be in 2007 dollars?

- Jim Katen, Oregon

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"It calculates today's dollars from dollars of the past. Just for fun, I entered $200 in 1975. Without looking, does anyone care to guess what it comes out to be in 2007 dollars? "

$450 as a minimum would be more in line with what should be charged. Sell a few extras and get the average up around $650 a fella could earn a living.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by ghentjr

"It calculates today's dollars from dollars of the past. Just for fun, I entered $200 in 1975. Without looking, does anyone care to guess what it comes out to be in 2007 dollars? "

$650 average would be nice. I put in 1980 and got around $450. Use 450 as a minimum sell a few extras and get the average up around $650 a fella could earn a living. Bye the way, anyone remember how much gas cost in 1980?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by ghentjr

Originally posted by ghentjr

By the way, anyone remember how much gas cost in 1980?

Hi,

Not in 1980, but I remember cost in 1971 when at 19 years old I was the youngest ARCO station owner in the world. I used to sell my regular for 37.9 cents a gallon, mid-grade was 39.9 cents a gallon and hi-test was 41.9 cents a gallon.

Sigh, I paid $2.89.9 cents a gallon for the premium I put in my tank yesterday.

OT - OF!!!

M.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In 1980 gasoline reached a record high of just over $3.00 depending on the coast. That was in 1980 dollars. Using the inflation chart that was over 6 big buckaroos per gallon. Now that was a hurtin year. Although it sounds crazy, maybe 5 bucks a gallon, with uncle sam taking everything over the cost of mfg and distribution we could eliminate the income tax.

But then again, restraint in spending would go a long way as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...