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Vinyl Siding Over Wood Shingles?


dtontarski
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I inspected a home a while back whose wood shingles were in pretty rough shape. The new owner is getting quotes now for vinyl siding.

She has quotes for installing right over the wood and quotes for tearing off the wood shingles prior to the vinyl installation. I would assume a tear off would be best practice...who knows what types of wdo's lurk within the old stuff. Is there a consensus opinion out there on what is the best practice?

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Best practices almost never include vinyl.

A very common practice is to overlay the shingles with fan fold foam to flatten the field and then install vinyl. They build out the door and window trim, cover it in aluminum and obscure pretty much every essence of what the house was on the quest toward banality.

A long as there's nailing, it works as good as vinyl ever works.

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I'm in total agreement on vinyl....yuk.

Your install procedures are pretty much as I understood them. I figured if I posted his query I'd hear some opinions from around the country and maybe even some horror stories on why this should not be done. Your opinions are always appreciated and usually worth a chuckle. Thanks Chad.

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Originally posted by dtontarski

I inspected a home a while back whose wood shingles were in pretty rough shape. The new owner is getting quotes now for vinyl siding.

She has quotes for installing right over the wood and quotes for tearing off the wood shingles prior to the vinyl installation. I would assume a tear off would be best practice...who knows what types of wdo's lurk within the old stuff. Is there a consensus opinion out there on what is the best practice?

Vinyl siding was originally conceieved and intended to be a re-siding product. In fact, the vinyl siding industry was taken aback at first when people started using it as the primary siding on houses.

If the old shingles are in good shape, there's nothing wrong with siding over them.

If the old shingles are, indeed damaged, they should come off or the damaged pieces should be replaced before the vinyl goes up.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Originally posted by dtontarski

I'm in total agreement on vinyl....yuk.

I figured if I posted his query I'd hear some opinions from around the country and maybe even some horror stories on why this should not be done.

If you're trying to dissuade them from encapsulating their home in leaky tupperware you can give them some of my thoughts: http://www.oldhouseweb.com/stories/Detailed/15022.shtml

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Originally posted by Chad Fabry

..........................build out the door and window trim, cover it in aluminum and obscure pretty much every essence of what the house was on the quest toward banality.

That made me laugh....

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  • 2 years later...

I am interested in siding because I have cedar shingles that are in good shape but have a horrible paint job. Seriously needs something--has chipping paint, checking, blistering, peeling, lumpy. We started to prep for repainting (ideally, I'd like to stain), but it looks like a losing proposition--I don't think there is a way to get these shingles ready for new paint.

I don't think they were ever primed; when paint came off, it looks like some more was slapped on; there're spots where you can see swirls from a sander.

The front of the mid-fifties ranch is sandstone so siding will be on sides and back. It wouldn't hurt to have some more insulation, too.

Does this sound like a case where siding can be applied over the shingles? As I said, shingles themselves are in good shape; just BAD paint. No moisture, mold, rot or insect problems. Any advice appreciated.

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Hi,

If you've got a little bit of roof overhang; apply felt and then vertical strapping on 16-inch centers. Then install window and door casing extensions and a rainscreen of horizontal siding of some type with wood trim. Hardiplank would look nice. A strip of roll-type ridge vent filter material at the top and bottom of the wall and she'll stay well ventilated.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Apricot,

I am from the "old school" that believes there are times when a homeowner should seek the advice of a professional, not the experts at the local big box store.

If your cedar shingles are in good shape they can be painted. Problem is likely there is seventeen coats of vinyl acrylic one coat paint on them that will cost to remove. A real professional painter would have no problems with that situation. I am not paying for the project, so vote for having them professionally painted.

The real problem with vinyl or any other artificial imitation cladding is the trims and other unique features must be altered to accomodate the additional thickness. As Chad notes above it never looks quite right, but sure makes it maintenance free.

You can add insulation in the sidewalls and still keep the cedar. There is a firm in Mich that drills a small 3/8" hole in the shingle butt and injects soy based foam. Looks nice and seems to be working without the extra work of shingle removal.

Vinyl will be final, especially after they stick nails all over the shingles and crack/break them!

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I don't think there is a way to get these shingles ready for new paint.

I have a Metabo Paint Remover. As I've said before, it's a chip spewing corded beaver type of thing that is a likely to inflict pain and may be the most dangerous tool I've ever used. It removes paint fast. I think you could strip all the paint off a 1500 square foot ranch in a long, agonizing day.

When you buy the tool, break off the little doors that cover the edge blades. The angst of intentionally breaking a new, expensive tool will save you the injury that you'll incur when they break during use and the 11,000 rpm cutting head flings them dependably, accurately at the operator.

I think gloves and safety glasses are for little girls who wear plaid skirts but when I use this tool, I wear both along with snug fitting long sleeves and a respirator.

paint remover

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Metabo tools are too spendy for me, especially a tool that will get such infrequent use. I have a Porter Cable paint remover (see link) that works pretty well. Mine is a much older model that uses a buffer/angle grinder motor housing but the foot assembly is the same, as are the carbide abrasive discs. If your not careful it will leave swirl marks. It is a bit heavy, and without any of the fancy safety covers on the Metabo it makes one hell of a mess. Tight fitting protective clothing is a must, as are snug fitting goggles and respirator.

http://www.tools-plus.com/porter-cable-7403.html

My best guess is that I have about 2000 man/hours (my wife & I both have big families, so there was a small army there) into the last paint job on my 1400 SF, 1870, 2 story farmhouse. I took it to bare wood on approx. 90% of the surfaces. That was almost ten years ago and it desperately needs another paint job, any of the original paint left behind is falling right off the wall.

Tom

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