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If there's fluid in a pipe and it's under pressure and if the fluid isn't moving, the pressure is going to be the same everywhere inside that pipe.

As soon as the fluid starts to flow through that pipe, the pressure is going to drop due to friction in the pipe -- even smooth-walled pipes can have a significant pressure drop particularly if the pipes are narrow.

I used to design gizmos that were operated by hydraulic rams. If we had a long run of hose between the compressor and the ram, we'd see surprising drops in pressure just from the friction losses. If I neglected to account for the pressure drop, the gizmo wouldn't work and I'd suffer cruel abuse from my boss.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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"...everyone refers to that as weak pressure though it may be you are technically correct."

Obviously not "everyone" and certainly not most of the folk in here who know there is a need to differentiate flow/volume from pressure in order to correctly report the issue. No "may be" about it.

"I agree, but at the same time feel ok with that term."

I have to disagree that you should feel Ok with it, once again especially in here, because it's unnecessarily confusing. If you are always going to refer to low flow rate from restrictions as low pressure, then how are you going to report or ask a question that's actually about low pressure?

Next time an agent or client asks..."how's the water pressure?", I suggest you answer "the pressure is fine, and so is the functional flow" or "the pressure is fine, but the flow is being restricted by a build up of rust in the old piping".

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Originally posted by AHI

My first real appointment is booked. It looks pretty straight forward. A good starting point. Brick town home built in 1953. I searched the address and came up with a preview linked below. Appears to be an easy job.

Have a look at the link and tell me if you think there are things I should keep in mind with a property of this type and era. I see the glass block windows in the basement which could be an egress problem depending on how the basement will be used. What do you see? Anything of interest?

http://www.coldwellbanker.com/servlet/P ... e=property

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Originally posted by slinger2k

Originally posted by AHI

My first real appointment is booked. It looks pretty straight forward. A good starting point. Brick town home built in 1953. I searched the address and came up with a preview linked below. Appears to be an easy job.

Have a look at the link and tell me if you think there are things I should keep in mind with a property of this type and era. I see the glass block windows in the basement which could be an egress problem depending on how the basement will be used. What do you see? Anything of interest?

http://www.coldwellbanker.com/servlet/P ... e=property

Ooops!!!

Congrats pal. Might not be a flip - current owner has been in it for 2 1/2 yrs as principal residence. Looks nice cosmetically. The basement is finished as a rec room/utility room. Typical Cville house - upper level bath at the front of the house (when you walk through the front door look up at ceiling - will probably find a patch or some older water stains). Nice that the mechanicals have been replaced and updated. The roof is shingle (so you can climb on it) - most rowhouses 'round here have furnace and water heater flues feeding a masonry chimney (check the connections at the bottom in the basement and up top at the flashing). Poke around as much as you can - you'll do fine. It'll be fun.

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The job is done. I see what you all mean by let the show begin. It was like being a performer on stage with everybody watching. You can imagine that I have plenty of refinement to do to get better at this gig.

I collected info and pictures on the site and then retreated to my office to compile the report. all together it took me twice as long as I would have liked. There were a number of issues that needed to be written up but I will not specify on them in this thread.

In the end I believe I delivered a worthy product to my clients who were very nice people. I doubt the agents were very happy with my report but thats the biz huh? They were professional none the less.

I found that my digital camera was the most depended upon tool. Its great to snap all those pictures since each one brings back the memory and tells a story that I could then put into words both orally and in writing.

I think my biggest time consuming problem was wandering aimlessly in my gathering information. I need to slap myself into line and just follow my report template in a systematic method.

I hope the next job goes smoother for me.

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Originally posted by AHI

The job is done. I see what you all mean by let the show begin. It was like being a performer on stage with everybody watching. You can imagine that I have plenty of refinement to do to get better at this gig.

I collected info and pictures on the site and then retreated to my office to compile the report. all together it took me twice as long as I would have liked. There were a number of issues that needed to be written up but I will not specify on them in this thread.

In the end I believe I delivered a worthy product to my clients who were very nice people. I doubt the agents were very happy with my report but thats the biz huh? They were professional none the less.

I found that my digital camera was the most depended upon tool. Its great to snap all those pictures since each one brings back the memory and tells a story that I could then put into words both orally and in writing.

I think my biggest time consuming problem was wandering aimlessly in my gathering information. I need to slap myself into line and just follow my report template in a systematic method.

I hope the next job goes smoother for me.

As you complete more inspections, you will find yourself more comfortable being in front of people and developing into a routine.

Kevin

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You’ll develop a routine – your report template may not be organized in the most efficient order to conduct the inspection, because houses are not organized the same.

For what it is worth here is my basic routine,

I arrive 15-20 minutes early – if someone is home I politely let them know I’ll be walking around the outside and will not need to come in until after the buyers arrive. I make notes or take pics of exterior components. Typically make 2 or 3 laps around the house. I stand back to get the big picture then move in for the details, check outlets, hose bibs, caulking, etc. Once the buyer arrives I always make 1 more lap with them, talk about drainage, a/c mx, etc. Then I do the roof and usually followed by the garage.

At whatever point the buyers arrive I stop where I am at, give them my dialogue on what will occur, what to expect, and what there jobs are (ask questions and be an extra set of eyes). I then lead the way into the kitchen and go over and sign the PIA. If I have not finished the exterior – roof – garage – I do it before I start the inside.

Once inside I do the kitchen first, then the work my way from top floors down. I do top down so that after I run water in the fixtures I can check for leaks in the area below. Always, look at unfinished basement floors for any wet spots. I do the electrical panel, HVAC systems, water heater, fireplace at whatever point I come across them. Inside each room I have a basic routine I follow as well.

Lastly I do the attic and finally the crawl space.

Good luck - based on the number of post you have you are way ahead of the curve.

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