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Testing Sump Pumps


Terence McCann
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It's called a bulb aspirator. It's a baby care product for getting snot out of their nose. Get one and any place that sells baby care products. Supermarkets, Walmart, etc....

One could also use a piece of rubber vacuum hose. The small diameter hose that is used in engine compartments. Put one end on the plug outlet and draw on the other.

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tn_20095198336_aspirator.jpg

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The tube is very small. Would that thing really fit on it? I find that sucking on the end of the tube is the best way to activate the pump.

Sorry,

It's bad enough that I have to crawl through all manner of filth from ratshit to bear shit in crawls around here; ain't no way I'm going to start intentionally tasting the stuff. The bulb'll have to do or it stays untested.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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I'll bet you have.........it's the "standard" hydramatic switch; the little bell shaped switch that attaches at the base of the pump......can't find a pic.

FTR, I suck on the tube.

Maybe, Most of the pumps I see have either external/detached float switches that hook up in line, or attached float switches that are covered with a box type cover.

I don't recall ever seeing a pump with a tube coming off of it that I would think is connected to a diaphram, or anything else for that matter.

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OK, I looked at the picture of the pump. Sure I've seen loads of those. I never realized that it was a diaphram in there. I always thought it was a float switch. I guess I learned something new today.

But, All I see is an insulated wire (wires) coming out of the switch. WHere is the tube? OK, I imagine its inside. But, do you really open it and check the switch? Is that something I should start doing? If so, I'll get a bulb aspirator. I do not suck tube.

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Hold on, wasn't there a thread recently about sump pumps being a potential shock hazard? I'll lift a float switch to see if the pump runs, or make note if I hear it run while I'm there. If any part of the pump or its connections looks questionable I use a tool with an insulated handle, if it looks dangerous I don't touch it at all. Tain't no way I'm gonna stick my head in a sump pit, let alone suck on a pump.

I'm really surprised WJ hasn't had a field day with that idea.[:-bigeyes

Tom

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Has anybody seen one properly placed and fully functional?

Thousands - without puttin' my lips on anything.

Around here, I think an inspector would miss the minimum standard of care mark for a home inspection if not testing something designed to be easily tested. In fact, I know one who paid a 5 figure settlement last year for not testing one. He disclaimed it too.

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Hold on, wasn't there a thread recently about sump pumps being a potential shock hazard? I'll lift a float switch to see if the pump runs, or make note if I hear it run while I'm there. If any part of the pump or its connections looks questionable I use a tool with an insulated handle, if it looks dangerous I don't touch it at all. Tain't no way I'm gonna stick my head in a sump pit, let alone suck on a pump.

I'm really surprised WJ hasn't had a field day with that idea.[:-bigeyes

Tom

Oh, I've monitored the thread and thought to myself, "OK, that's it. People are sucking on tubes that go to crawl space sump pumps. This is not a profession. It's a traveling geek act."

As you might guess, I might've pulled up on the float, and reported whether or not the pump worked. I also would've told the customers that sump pumps -- as I know them anyway -- are useless. Has anybody seen one properly placed and fully functional? I haven't.

And really, what are they gonna do to you if you're wrong about a sump pump? Nothing, that's what.

WJ

I've seen... and installed pumps that were placed properly, and fully functional.

But, what I've also seen is that lots of folks don't realize that they need to be maintained.

I seen many pumps like the one in the picture of the original thread. I have never noticed the tube on the plug, and find it hard to believe that I missed it. I will surely look for it next time.

So to test it, do you recommened wearing rubber boots when putting the plug in your mouth, while it is plugged in, and sucking the tube?

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So to test it, do you recommened wearing rubber boots when putting the plug in your mouth, while it is plugged in, and sucking the tube?

Only if you are not testing how well it is grounded.

Most of the testing bulbs (rubber globes that when squeezed create suction) are missing from these sump systems. The snot bulb suction thingy will work without causing you to curl your hair from sucking on a badly grounded system.

But if you are looking for a thrill . . . . . .

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For anyone that cares about how things work.........

The tube extends up through the cord, and sticks out of the plug assembly, as shown in Kibbel's photo.

There is no cross connection; you could suck on it all day, and never get anything in your mouth. It's an air tube. Connected to a sealed switch.

Suck on the tube, put your finger over the tube when you unsuck, plug it in, check pump function. Is there someone that thought one put their face down into the outlet and sucked on the thing when it was plugged in?! [:-bigeyes

Is this the pansyass wiener patrol? ........we crawl around in ratshit for a living, slog through Section 8 crackholes, actually discuss the go-no go criteria for entry into turd floating crawlspaces (one has to ASK?!), and suddenly folks are squeamish about brief mouth contact with a sealed plastic tube?!?

If I saw someone using a bulb aspirator, I'd have to enroll them in a 12 step program.........[:-irked]

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I'm with Kirt. It's not that difficult or nasty. Wipe of the dust first. I carry too many gadgets now to also include a bulb aspirator. I'd most likely leave it at one of the houses after a few days anyway. About half of the sump pumps in these parts have the plastic tube. 1/4 have a float. The rest are tested only if there is a connected hose close by.

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