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dryer vent


Chad Fabry
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Me Too,

The CPSC has been trying to educate folks to the fact that corrugated metal and plastic outlets from the back of dryers are fire hazards since about 1996 - 1997. CPSC recommend replacing all corrugated outlets with smooth-walled, metal box-vents (Cost about $20. at home centers) and the vent from the outlet the its terminus with smooth-walled metal vents that have been taped with heat-resistant foil, not screwed together, at joints.

CPSC found that over a 3-4 year period there were more than 15,000 fires started in the U.S. from lint fires caused by corrugated ducts.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Originally posted by Chad Fabry

I inspected a two unit where the dryers (elctric) were vented using 4 inch galvanized pipe. I looked inside and there were no lint deposits and it was pretty smooth walled. 8 foot, straight runs to the exterior.

I noted it, but not as a defect, and now I'm wondering... what do you folks think?

Sounds like a great set up. You know it isn't going to become crushed or come apart at the seams like a duct might. And if a fire does start in there, it certainly won't burn through the pipe & spread. In fact, it'll probably burn itself out before it damages the pipe.

Maybe I'll install a pipe on my own dryer vent. . .

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Now hold on a second. I figured that Chad, being the techy sort of guy that he is, meant "pipe" when he said "4 inch galvanized pipe." As in a thing that would break your toe if you dropped it on it.

But everyone's responding as if he meant "duct". As in 26 gauge sheet metal. Which is it?

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Originally posted by Chad Fabry

I inspected a two unit where the dryers (elctric) were vented using 4 inch galvanized pipe. I looked inside and there were no lint deposits and it was pretty smooth walled. 8 foot, straight runs to the exterior.

I noted it, but not as a defect, and now I'm wondering... what do you folks think?

Sounds bombproof to me.

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Hi Neal,

Well, in your case the manufacturer's listing and labeling supercedes the code. Without the manufacturer's specs, it really depends on what code your municipality is using. The IRC says, 25ft. max minus 2-1/2 ft. per 45 degree bend or 5ft. per 90 degrees [iRC 1501.3,2437.c]. The UMC says 14ft. max including two 90 degree bends minus 2ft. per additional 90 degree bend [uMC 504.3.2].

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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The 25' rule minus appropriate distances to accommodate for bends was addressed by CABO back in '92. Not adhering to this can cause lots of problems in houses where the laundry room is near the front wall of a second floor, and the duct sustains multiple forty-five or ninety degree bends. Of course, it can't be redirected without removing drywall or slicing a hole in the front wall of the house.

John

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