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Charcoal in air duct


esch
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Hi,

The charcoal will absorb odors but I doubt that placing a bunch of briquettes on a cookie sheet on the floor of the return will do much good. Now, if they'd gone to a fish supply store, bought a big old bag of activated charcoal and stopped off at the big orange box for some galvanized mesh and some stop strips, and then made a charcoal filter that completely covered that opening, by sandwiching a layer of charcoal between two sheets of mesh, they would probably eliminate a bunch of odor in air returning to the home through that ductwork;.....and create air side issues with the HVAC system that will probably play havock with head pressure at the HVAC system and then live to regret it later.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Why is there charcoal in air return chamber? The return grille is in the kitchen is it supposed to cut down on odors?

I see folks trying to use charcoal to absorb moisture.

What's a return vent doing in a kitchen?

Indian house built by Cherokee Nation....

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Don't you guys watch the food channel? There's no better place to store dried buffalo meat, than on racks over charcol in a return air duct.

I thought everyone saw that show.

Oh yeah, I forgot, I've got a side of buffalo meat curing above the wet vent over the roof.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Activated charcoal will adsorb many of the organics that contribute to bad odors. Activated charcoal is charcoal that has been treated with oxygen to increase the bonding sites (surface area). When certain chemicals pass over the activated charcoal they bond chemically (adsorb) to the surface of the charcoal.

Charcoal briquets, obviously, are not activated.

Tim

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I remember a house that had charcoal in every closet in the house and under the stairs and behind the stove and in the pantry and just about every out of the way place you looked. I wondered what they were thinking, but knew whatever it was they were operating on folklore. At least they were trying, it was obvious they had very little money. It ain't easy being poor.

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I remember a house that had charcoal in every closet in the house and under the stairs and behind the stove and in the pantry and just about every out of the way place you looked. I wondered what they were thinking, but knew whatever it was they were operating on folklore. At least they were trying, it was obvious they had very little money. It ain't easy being poor.

Glade plug-ins are cheaper then charcoal though. =)

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Last house I had with those little bottles of oil plugged into receptacles, I unplugged them all, put them all out on the front doorstep and then threw open all of the windows for about 15 minutes. The cat urine smell came back.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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One of the great mysteries of life; where the hell did native Americans find such long straight thin tapering teepee poles in nature? I've never really seen anything like those growing around in the wild anywhere.

Pinus contorta AKA Lodgepole Pine

http://extension.usu.edu/range/woody/lodgepolepine.htm

http://www.albertabound.com/History/Tree.htm

Another one of life's great mysteries solved!

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