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Architectural Name?


Mike Lamb
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Yeah, it fulfills every requirement that I can find. It's a pediment, false front or not.

In my reports, I call it a front gable parapet. Everyone seems to know what that means.

More importantly, if there's a problem with it, which there always is, I have a picture of it with an arrow pointing at it.

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I've always called it a "false front" too, or a "facade". In fact, Funk and Wagnalls number two definition of the word "facade" is: A front or a false appearance. So, calling it a facade is accurate. And, it is indeed also a parapet, which by vurtue of its appearance serves as a facade.

I just finished paging through Architectural Graphics Standards, thinking I'd probably see a detail that would name it, but no luck.

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Bill, what are the missing elements that prevent it from being considered a pediment?

A pediment is not a triangle stuck onto a building.

A pediment has projecting moldings of the cornice around the perimeter, resulting in a recessed area called a tympanum. The earliest had releif sculptures within the tympanum.

The Greeks created the pediment. It was the decoration of the end of the roof at the gable-end of their buildings, which is the facade. The Romans took it and stuck it over doors, windows and niches. The Italians took a bite out of the peak - it's called a broken pediment. 17th century British architects stuck a finial in the gap of the broken pediment.

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I've always called it a "false front" too, or a "facade". In fact, Funk and Wagnalls number two definition of the word "facade" is: A front or a false appearance. So, calling it a facade is accurate. And, it is indeed also a parapet, which by vurtue of its appearance serves as a facade.

A facade is the entire front or "public face" of a building - not one element.
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I've always called it a "false front" too, or a "facade". In fact, Funk and Wagnalls number two definition of the word "facade" is: A front or a false appearance. So, calling it a facade is accurate. And, it is indeed also a parapet, which by vurtue of its appearance serves as a facade.

A facade is the entire front or "public face" of a building - not one element.

I just zero'd in on the word "false" in that definition, figuring it meant both - a front or a false front. [:-wiltel]

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BTW I hope that thing has some rebar or something to stiffen it. The right puff of wind might make it a headache hazard.

Being 12" thick, I'd venture that it is brick backed with 8" block - core filled with rods and mortar. The brick and block will be tied together with duro-wall. I've laid up a few of those.

Of course, now that I've posted this, it will probably topple and smash a car tomorrow... [:-wiltel]

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Chicago is full of them.

Here's one thing I know for sure........

If you wrap roofing up over the back of them, they condense so much moisture that the things freeze/thaw wildly and the frost heave causes them to lean outward over the sidewalk.

I gather that also causes greater than usual efflorescence, Yes?

If memory serves, I don't remember ever dealing with an anchorage system for the cast coping, but it's awfully heavy. Two guys had a hard time gently easing it into place, so the wind would have a hard time budging it.

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From a week ago. This is similar and had roofing and roofing cement all the way up the back of it. I don't think it was leaning. There were interior moisture problems.

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Look at that, Mike's post shows a "Pediment" over the front porch. It has the Raking Cornices, a Horizontal Cornice, and vinyl covered Tympanum. If the tympanum is filled with sculptures, it could have been built by the Greeks and we should notify the Smithsonian, they may be looking for a missing archeological treasure.

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