Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Hi folks,

I'm mudding the walls now. How should I handle the joint at the ceiling of the shower area where the tiles will go up to the ceiling? This is where Hardie Backer and drywall come together to form the inside corner joint at the ceiling.

I was planning on finishing all the drywall and painting before beginning to set any tile.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The same way you handled the other drywall to Hardie joints, except you may want to use a corner trowel.

On the vertical surfaces I have the drywall terminating a couple of inches under where the tile will end so those joints are not relevant since they will be covered with thinset. The only joint with any exposure is the one I mentioned.

Unless anyone has a better idea, I guess I'll use drywall tape and not pay too much attention to the Hardie side since the tile will cover that part.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The same way you handled the other drywall to Hardie joints, except you may want to use a corner trowel.

If you're going to use a corner trowel, close the door so your friends won't see you with it.

Blum, that reminds me of a joke my mother told me when I was a teenager.

What do fat girls and mopeds have in common?

They're both fun to ride until your friends see you on one!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Durabond 90. Mud one side of the corner, let it dry, then mud the other side. It's easier for beginners that way; doing them both at once isn't hard, but it's a little tricky for first timers.

I have a corner trowel hidden somewhere......

Link to post
Share on other sites

This is the first time I've done an entire room.

I used a corner trowel to set the tape but went to a 12" knife for the rest. Place in corner and spread outwards.

I used the following video as a tutorial. I like the goal of minimal sanding. Knocking down ridges before the mud totally sets seems helpful.

Download Attachment: icon_photo.gif P1240714.JPG

1328.38?KB

Download Attachment: icon_photo.gif P1240715.JPG

1044.19?KB

Download Attachment: icon_photo.gif P1240716.JPG

1550.49?KB

Download Attachment: icon_photo.gif P1240717.JPG

1507.1?KB

Link to post
Share on other sites

Not bad. If you already bought metal corner bead for the outsides, take it back and get a roll of Strait Flex corner tape. It's a thick perforated paper tape made for outside corners. It's a little pricey but it's worth it.

If you smack a corner later on, you end up with a dent to fix instead of a wad of bent metal that's never going back where it was.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Metal bead already there...too late. Maybe next time.

Sanding is going well. I'm using flexible blocks to dress the corners and rough edges first. Then I'll switch to 220 grid style and smooth out the fields and blend everything in.

I thought about running a fine bead of paintable caulk down the inside corners for a fine smoothing touch. Anyone ever done this?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought all my doors as solid seconds. Made all my jams. All the trim for my windows from rough opening to finish. Made all my moldings, which ended up being 3 piece. Made my own cabinets and counters excluding doors and drawers. Measured everything like 6 times. Bla, bla, bla. People come by and see it say, "Nice, have any beer".

Link to post
Share on other sites

This is the first time I've done an entire room.

I used a corner trowel to set the tape but went to a 12" knife for the rest. Place in corner and spread outwards.

I used the following video as a tutorial. I like the goal of minimal sanding. Knocking down ridges before the mud totally sets seems helpful.

Download Attachment: icon_photo.gif P1240714.JPG

1328.38?KB

Download Attachment: icon_photo.gif P1240715.JPG

1044.19?KB

Download Attachment: icon_photo.gif P1240716.JPG

1550.49?KB

Download Attachment: icon_photo.gif P1240717.JPG

1507.1?KB

Is it common practice to put that many screws in the drywall?

Marc

Link to post
Share on other sites

Whoever suggested using clothesline rope for tile spacers, thanks. It's a great idea. I'm using 3/16 nylon and it blows those little tile spacers out of the water. I cut the rope sections to about 8". I leave the bottom part protruding to make it easy to pull them out.

In other news, we had to deal with defective tub issues and some crafty thinking about the best way to level the floor. I'll be using a different size notched trowel in various areas under the hardie boards. I'll check again after that and might scratch in a few patches with thinset and a trowel before setting floor tiles.

Also, I realized too late that my tub alcove rough opening is 60 1/2" which is 1/4" too big. This posed problems with tile overlap at the tub lip. Rather than rip everything back out I decided to use a 1/2" notched trowel to spread thinset for the wall tiles. The added thickness makes up the difference just about perfect. When the mortar mix is just right, working with the heavy application is not too cumbersome.

Checkout the warped tub skirt. Also, the skirt hit the floor and the feet were still 1/4" off the floor. F'ed up!

Download Attachment: icon_photo.gif P1240723.JPG

1487.91 KB

Playing with various tile layouts.

Download Attachment: icon_photo.gif P1240725.JPG

958.98 KB

You can see the difference in the original floor mortar bed as much as 1/2" from one end to the other.

Download Attachment: icon_photo.gif P1240729.JPG

1557.98 KB

Taped in and setting tile.

Download Attachment: icon_photo.gif P1240743.JPG

1184.41 KB

Mortar bed with 1/2" notched trowel.

Download Attachment: icon_photo.gif P1240746.JPG

1094.38 KB

Link to post
Share on other sites

No water-proofing behind the enclosure tile?

Nothing that I can find in the Hardie documents even recommend, let alone require any additional waterproofing. A video at their site shows the stuff virtually impermeable to water.

I have the joints filled, taped and covered with thinset according to their instructions. The mortar bed will be 1/4" thick and I'll be sure to use grout sealer (and re-seal as recommended).

I suppose when it comes to good, better or best, I'm somewhere in the middle. Do you think it's going to fall apart or cause other problems?

Link to post
Share on other sites
I cut the rope sections to about 8". I leave the bottom part protruding to make it easy to pull them out.

No No No. Don't cut the rope into small pieces.

Let it run the entire length of the course. Then, you only have one to pull later. Jump it over the horizontals, where the vertical runs intersect.

Unless, you're staggering the pattern. In that case, you still leave the horizontals full length.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...