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PEX manifold fitting question


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I'm in the process of installing PEX plumbing in a new construction house. I just mounted the manifold (Apollo brand) but I can't figure out how a couple of the fittings connect.

this is the manifold;

100_3694.jpg

this are the fittings in question;

100_3689.jpg

This is the ONE o-ring that came with the manifold, which side does it go on? the manifold side or the PEX hose side of the fitting?

It doesn't quite fit on the brass insert, it doesn't stay put on it.

100_3691.jpg

Or is the o-ring optional?

Is there an o-ring missing?

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That looks like an exterior wall you have that manifold installed within. It should be in the attic or some other location where you can get to it if you need to.

Joseph, are you building this whole house yourself?

When I visited the City of West Monroe website, I got the impression that there was very little code enforcement in place in this town. Lots of towns like that in La. The state is being lax in pushing for uniform code enforcement.

Marc

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Attached is the installation sheet from the Apollo PEX website.

Does not appear that you have enough space on the sides for adequate connection of the PEX pipe ... Turns are to be "gradual". Location between those studs will end up with "sharp" turns unless you plan on extra connections to put in right angle turns, but then that would increase odds of leaks with many more connections/crimps.

Download Attachment: icon_adobe.gif Apollo-PEX-Installation_A9R1CB0.pdf

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Hi,

Yeah, the first thing I thought when I saw the photo - not enough space.

We're inspectors. We don't see those taken apart. One of might swag a guess about the placement of that O-ring and screw it up. You're on the net. You can find the installation instructions on the net as quickly as one of us can. Go for it!

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Marc,

yes, I am building the entire house myself [:-wiltel] I did pay someone to do the slab and the plumbing in the slab, other than that it's been all me...and yes it is an exterior wall, I plan on building a box around the manifold like this guy did;

manabloc_pex_water_system1.jpg

with a nice, cabinet style door for it.

I haven't had any dealings with the inspectors in West Monroe yet but I haven't heard any horror stories yet so...[:-thumbu]

Mike,

I have been looking all over online about those fittings, I usually do that before I come to you guys. Maybe I can call Apollo and ask them?

Mike, Nolan (thanks for the Apollo PDF),

Concerning the radius of the hoses, I plan on drilling the studs and going through them with the hoses so the radius will be very gradual.

Like this guy did;

coppervspex1.jpg

I'll post pictures as I go along to make sure I'm not making any mistakes along the way.

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You might consider hiring your own inspector just for your own protection. This can be a very cheap form of insurance, especially if you are not skilled as a plumber, carpenter, electrician, and a/c installer.

Point is you don't know what you don't know and we REGULARLY find screw-ups by professional builders.

Get some one to do a pre-drywall inspection while you are there. It can be very educational.

Good luck.

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JV -

I like those sweeps and the access, but consider "down the road" if there is a failure and you have to replace a line. Make sure you don't have to re-invent the wall should you have to have access.

Not that you ever want to or hope to, but I'm just retentive about 'planning ahead' for (as Jim L. commented: You don't know what you don't know).

Being on an exterior wall I would do everything I could about wrapping each of those supply lines with an insulation wrap. Sort of similar to what is on an A/C refrigerant line.

Even thought you are "South" and in LA ... we are similarly "South" in the Dallas area, but they still wrap each of the PEX distribution lines with the insulation sleeves.

Just better to safe than sorry and when it is open it is far easier to do it now.

.

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I think drilling through the studs to provide a nice arc for the PEX as it connects to the manifold is just fine. This is also a very common method to support the PEX and provide a gradual bend in the line so the fittings are not stressed.

I would not worry about unknown down the road repairs; really not any different than a copper line in a wall needing to be repaired. I would have a concern with the manifold being on the outside wall and it being subject to freezing. I know that you are in West Monroe LA, but Y'all still get some freezing temps from time to time.

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Better pressure regulation. A fixture served by a manifold with a 3/4" supply suffers less drop in pressure under load than a daisy chained 1/2" line.

For a given flow, the 3/4 suffers less than half the pressure drop of a 1/2"

I get sharply reminded of that every time I forget and fill the kitchen sink with wash water or start the washer when the spouse is in the shower.

Marc

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what is the "attraction" of the manifold system vs. a branch type system like has been around since indoor plumbing?

Pressure will be more balanced, and money will be saved on energy costs, while I believe installation costs will be higher.

I doubt that there's much savings in energy once you account for the wasted hot water that's used up when *each* fixture has to flush its feeder line to get hot water.

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I'm still waiting to seem my first PEX plumbing system; can't use it here.

Why wouldn't the installation requirements for these use 1 1/4" laterals, with 1/2 or 3/4 branches?

Many are done that way. I see 1-1/4 inch stepped to 1-inch and then to 3/4 and 1/2 inch distribution in PEX all the time.

The manibloc system in the photo is not the default around here; it's actually pretty rarely seen in comparison to the majority of PEX systems. PEX is overwhelmingly the most common product used in new construction here now.

I rarely see all-copper or all-CPVC systems any more in new construction.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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  • 2 weeks later...

This PEX design guide is a great source of information.

http://www.huduser.org/Publications/PDF ... _guide.pdf

I have found many references to 1/2" home run PEX systems supplying hot water sooner, and more efficiently. A 3/4" is line is more than twice the volume of a 1/2" line, so it would of course depend on how long the "trunk" was, and how long the 'branch' lines. In a small house where any particular hot water tap was used frequently, there may be no savings. In a MacMansion, the distance from HWT to a tap might be substantial, (but then there are probaly several HWT or a HW circulator).

The savings really come with the speed of setting up a homerun system and the lack of fittings hidden in the walls or floor.

When I first saw this manifold block I was thinking it was a radiant heat system and I found myself in rare disagreement with Scott. I like to consider the lifetime of the house and its systems. And after 20 years up here, these systems leak, pieces need replacement, and hiding it in a wall is just asking for trouble. Standard practice is surface mounting and I really do prefer it.

But this is strictly a water distribution system and find far less need for maintenance, or problems with leaks. But it does come back to the installation being in an outside wall, assuming that is an outside wall, and that is certainly not a good idea.

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