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Roof to wall flashing retrofit


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I'd like to get a few opinions on a flashing installation at a roof/wall intersection on a hard-coat building. A 3-season room was installed after construction and the installer used copper counter flashing installed over the face of the stucco that was supposedly let-in to the cladding. There was so much caulk slathered over the area that I could not pull back the flashiing to see if any step flashings were installed. They really did a sloppy job.

Here's part of the problem. This was a re-inspection for a past client on their townhome. They were concerned with this and some other flashings on the building. The builder that installed the 3-season room is long gone, but he did get permits and this was approved by the muni inspectors. They would have to pay for the repairs themselves. Have any of you guys seen a retrofit like this and if so, does it work well? Thanks for your help.

Tony

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I'd like to get a few opinions on a flashing installation at a roof/wall intersection on a hard-coat building. A 3-season room was installed after construction and the installer used copper counter flashing installed over the face of the stucco that was supposedly let-in to the cladding. There was so much caulk slathered over the area that I could not pull back the flashiing to see if any step flashings were installed. They really did a sloppy job.

Here's part of the problem. This was a re-inspection for a past client on their townhome. They were concerned with this and some other flashings on the building. The builder that installed the 3-season room is long gone, but he did get permits and this was approved by the muni inspectors. They would have to pay for the repairs themselves. Have any of you guys seen a retrofit like this and if so, does it work well? Thanks for your help.

Tony

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I am having a hard time reading your post. Have you ever heard of a paragraph?

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Seems obvious that there's no casing bead along the bottom of the stucco. I don't see how it can be considered properly flashed if the bead isn't there.

That's one of the drawbacks of stucco, can't flash it right after the original install.

Flashing should be visible below the counter-flashing.

I don't take much stock in muni-inspections anymore. I consulted a chief building inspector recently on a high-wind structural issue and he said lots of state mandated requirements are not enforced because the idea previously got too many builders angry and made the issue too politically hot to touch.

I'd tell my client that because the stucco work was already finished when I got there, I can't see much so I can't guarantee water intrusion issues but the little I did see was enough that I wouldn't be the least bit surprised if it does end up leaking. You can't retrofit casing bead into 3 coat stucco.

Marc

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It will work as long as the caulking is maintained and there is sufficient roof overhang above to keep that wall dry.

Yes of course we have seen this done and we all know it is wrong. I would report on whether there is visible damage or leaking.

Then tell them it needs repair and constant monitoring until such repairs can be paid for.

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To confirm step flashing in an installation like that, take a thin-bladed knife, slip it under the counterflashing until you feel it touch something. Then slowly draw it downhill along the surface of the roof. If there's step flashing there, you'll feel it go click, click, click, at the bottom edge of each piece of flashing.

If there's no flashing, you'll "feel" scratch, scratch, scratch if it's just sheathing; scrunch, scrunch, scrunch if it's felt; or, in this case, scrape, scrape, scrape if its stucco.

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To confirm step flashing in an installation like that, take a thin-bladed knife, slip it under the counterflashing until you feel it touch something. Then slowly draw it downhill along the surface of the roof. If there's step flashing there, you'll feel it go click, click, click, at the bottom edge of each piece of flashing.

If there's no flashing, you'll "feel" scratch, scratch, scratch if it's just sheathing; scrunch, scrunch, scrunch if it's felt; or, in this case, scrape, scrape, scrape if its stucco.

That's a great tip, thanks. The homeowner has found the builder somehow and I talked to him the other day about this and he rememberewd this set up. He told me that they did not put in the step flashing for some reason. I sort of stopped listening as to his reason why.

Thanks to everyone that responded. Morgan-sorry? I guess? Yeesh.

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The trouble I have with that installation Tony is the hard coat being caulked to the counter flashing. If water is behind the siding where does it end up? I just don't like the idea of channeling water behind any flashing. If some muni inspector or contractor says it's ok I'd be happy to have it on their back.

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