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Wavy vinyl siding on a HUD-Code


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That side faces the sun? [:-magnify

It looks to be nailed too tight. Probably that. Cheap vinyl, no doubt.

A buddy who is a builder just replaced vinyl in a South-facing inside corner for the second time. This corner is on the second floor with a mod bit carport below, but still, must be thin vinyl to warp as much as it did twice in one year.

The first time, he sent the sub contractor back to replace it.

This time, they did rain screen and Hardie plank painted to match the vinyl on the other walls.

(Builders have to provide a warranty on new construction here, 2, 5, and 10 year. Something like this should go back to the manufacturer, but he can't wait for the BS process. Their vinyl is crap anyway.)

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If I suspect vinyl siding is nailed too tight, I grab a piece at a seam and attempt to slide it back and forth. It should move without too much effort. Although a piece with a penetration may not move. Or a piece that is butt ended in the corner is sometimes intentionally nailed tight just at the corner. So I do the test on a piece within the field somewhere, one without a penetration.

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I agree with the tight nailing.

However, about a week ago I was walking around my neighborhood and saw the worst distorted vinyl siding on a wall that I have ever seen. No windows on that wall or the wall of the adjacent neighbor's house. There is a storage shed right next to the house with a black asphalt shingle roof. I assume that was the cause.

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I would have to say that it is reflected heat from some source.. In my backyard from late December to around mid February I can get reflected sunlight from a home that is about 75 yards away on my patio that registers around 130f degrees for about thirty minutes a day.

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tn_201611291122_Photo_23.jpg

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No burn pile. 'Reflected light' and 'nailed too tight' both look promising.

I didn't think of attempting John D's slide test but I did depress the vinyl hard several times thinking I'd find that the sheathing had bowed out. That didn't pan out but after reading John D's post, I realize now that the panels would have yielded sideways when I did that and didn't.

Sending out the report tomorrow AM. I think John D got it. Thanks to everyone.

Marc

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Just check the weather a week before the date of manufacturer in 2002 (when it rolled off the assembly line) and county where the HUD-Code was built. On that day, temps were low of 54, high of 78.

Today was mid-70's. Factory could have screwed up this vinyl install and never learned of it.

The vinyl siding was nailed too tightly in some areas. It should be nailed light enough so that the individual panels can expand and contract with the seasons. Nailing too tightly restricts movement and causes it to bulge between the nails in the summer. You can see this bulging in the middle section of the front wall. The consequences of this issue are mostly cosmetic and do not justify attempting to fix it. Lots of stuff in inspection reports like this are just for your information.

Marc

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........may be a light weight brand siding specifically provided for the HUD code market, although many manufacturers are now using standard grade materials. Also, it may be fastened with staples which are easily over-driven and end up too tight. And last, the sheathing may be very flimsy material which provides lots of bumps and lumps. As suggested, it's a good idea to unzip (the siding[:-paperba) and look at the behind the scenes aspects of the install.......Greg

Marc, who was the manufacturer?

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........may be a light weight brand siding specifically provided for the HUD code market, although many manufacturers are now using standard grade materials. Also, it may be fastened with staples which are easily over-driven and end up too tight. And last, the sheathing may be very flimsy material which provides lots of bumps and lumps. As suggested, it's a good idea to unzip (the siding[:-paperba) and look at the behind the scenes aspects of the install.......Greg

Marc, who was the manufacturer?

There was a small hole in the siding which allowed me to verify OSB. No WRB.

Belmont. Based in MS.

Marc

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Just in case you don't know, you can use a vinyl zip tool to un-zip and re-zip the siding so that you can actually look at the nails if you suspect tight nailing. I always keep one in the car.

I have one but have never used it. I'm afraid something will F up for sure; crack the vinyl, can't get it back on! I just peek behind the seams to see if there is a MB.

I would go with over nailing on this picture.

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I have one but have never used it. I'm afraid something will F up for sure; crack the vinyl, can't get it back on!

I've used it at least a hundred times, maybe a few hundred, in the last 20 years. There's a knack to getting the last few inches to zip up again but, that aside, I can't remember ever having a problem with it.

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