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Complete noob here so if this need to be moved to another section please forgive me. I’m a disabled veteran and looking to get into the home inspection industry.

 

Looking online I see literally dozens of training schools and opportunities to get started as a home inspector. However, I can’t find any reviews on these courses or companies.

 

If you were starting out today, or bringing a new employee in, where would you suggest they get their training?

 

Thanks in advance for any help you may give.

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You learn this profession by practicing it and by coming here to read and to post.

The schools are for meeting regulatory requirements and for giving manna to the folks who run the schools.

The lucky ones are taken in and trained by a good inspector.  The good inspectors are about 1 out of 50, at best.

Edited by Marc

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Unfortunately, I can’t imagine anyone locally wanting to train their competition, whether they’re a good inspector or a bad inspector.

Therefore, I am looking for information about the schools and training programs.

Edited by TAH

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2 hours ago, TAH said:

Unfortunately, I can’t imagine anyone locally wanting to train their competition, whether they’re a good inspector or a bad inspector.

Therefore, I am looking for information about the schools and training programs.

you'd be surprised

20 something years ago pro inspectors right in my market as well as outside mentored me & used my vehicle for ride alongs, no sense in wasting their gas & time to train me on their gigs & it also showed them i was willing to show up on time and treat this as a profession unlike many that think this is a get training & licensed where required & start making $70k or more a year as advertised by many of the schools

over the years i've annually sent out invitations to the newly licensed for collaborative "earn while you learn" opportunities

my thinking is better for clients to have knowledgeable inspections rather than getting ripped off by some of the checkbox chimps still infiltrating the industry & what i offer will be repaid in spades which it has

this  list i created over a number of years are the many that have 10 fold

I'd like to thank all of you for your continued trust, confidence and support when referring the Commercial, EIFS, AMSV, Infrared Thermography, Moisture Analysis, Phase, Stucco, exterior cladding specialty inspections & general property inspections making this another fantastic year for
ADAIR INSPECTION.
In the event your name does not appear here it's probably my age related absentmindedness or client did not mention, please feel free to add your contact details in your reply!

Aaron Miller http://www.texasinspector.com/

AC Tool Supply http://www.aikencolon.com/dallas-tx-texas-infrared.html

Alamode http://www.alamode.com/inspector

Alan Leibel Atty. http://www.pamlaw.com/Attorneys/Alan-S-Leibel.shtml

Bill Warner http://bcwarner.com/ for all the behind the scenes efforts

Brian Bassett http://www.wall2wallhomeinspectionsdfw.com/

Bruce Thompson http://www.thompsonpropertyinspection.com/

Charley Bottger http://www.freedomexpressinspections.com/

Collin Cowan http://www.cowaninspection.com/

Craig Lemmon 817-291-9056

Dale Duffy for all the behind the scenes efforts

Dan Cahill D & B Inspection Services, Inc. 214-808-3665

Donnie D. Mortimer http://www.tx-reab.com/agents-list/54098-donnie-d-mortimer-priority-home-inspections-allen-tx-75013

Emmanuel Scanlan http://www.psinspection.com/index.php

Frank Adame http://www.sbhinspections.com/contact.html

George Russell http://georgerussellprofessionalinspections.com/

James Young MasterTechHomes LLC

J.D. Fuller http://easttexashomeinspection.com/contact-us/

Jim Cole Cole Real Estate Services 972-571-6646

Jim Gibbs http://www.gibbsandgibbs.com/ Jim Luttrall http://www.mrinspector.net/seller/about-us.html

John Bowman for all the behind the scenes efforts

John Cahill http://www.cahillinspection.com/

John Safstrom http://www.systematichomeinspections.com/

Kris Svendsen http://www.vikinginspections.com/

Lila Feng Keller Williams Realty 817-920-7700 Office

Mike Wortman http://www.homesafeinspections.net/i...id=2&Itemid=25

NACBI http://nacbi.org/

Paul Ito http://www.theitogroup.com/index.htm Rashada Hemingway http://rhemingway.cbapex.com/agent/8174036886/rashada-hemingway

Rick Hurst http://www.homeworksinspection.com/

Terry Smith Metro Dallas Realty 469-251-7698

Thom Walker http://castleinspectionagency.com/index.php

US Inspect http://www.usinspect.com/

Will Misegades http://redfishinspections.com/
 

Edited by BADAIR

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14 hours ago, TAH said:

Unfortunately, I can’t imagine anyone locally wanting to train their competition, whether they’re a good inspector or a bad inspector.

Therefore, I am looking for information about the schools and training programs.

Some of the more experienced inspectors, 'good ones', won't mind taking you in, at least briefly.  The challenge is to find them in your area, if there are any.

A guy contacted me a week ago with such a request.  He wants to see what it's like before he commits.  I invited him over to join me on a few inspections.  Even if he becomes my competition, I'll always have 17 years on him.  Someone did the same to me in 2002.  I'll be forever grateful to him.

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Back in the dark ages, Texas actually required ride alongs for new inspectors and you had to find a qualified inspector willing to sponsor you. Due to being in a small town and qualified inspectors there not wanting to train their completion, I drove 2 hours each way for 25 "hands on" inspections at his business and then had indirect supervision of 175 inspections by that sponsoring inspector of my inspections. I paid him a fee for each inspection that I did where he reviewed each report. Texas has since changed the licensing requirements many times but I think the direct supervision of an experienced inspector was invaluable.

Not to get into your business but I can't imagine having a significant physical disability and doing inspections. It may not seem like it but it can be very challenging. Be sure to evaluate your abilities and do at least a few ride alongs to see if it is really a fit before investing the time and money. Contrary to what the inspection schools will tell you, this gig is not "easy money" and most inspectors are not truly profitable until about year two or three. Texas has a two year license and a very high percentage of new inspectors never renew their license.  Welcome to the fray!

 

Edited by inspector57

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My “disability” is only a VA 10% rating on one knee and I’ve had that fixed with a partial replacement a few years ago. It’s now better than my old “good” knee.

I’m hoping my sponsor will get me to the point where I’m basically doing the inspection and he’s there to correct my mistakes and catch my misses.
 

Luckily, where I live (Richmond, VA), we have other significant markets an hour away. From looking at their websites they don’t really work my area so they might be willing to train me. At least I’m hoping.

 

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31 minutes ago, TAH said:

I’m hoping my sponsor will get me to the point where I’m basically doing the inspection and he’s there to correct my mistakes and catch my misses.

A simple ride along is one thing. It helps you to see a home inspection from inside the engine compartment and decide whether or not it's for you. You shouldn't have trouble finding people who'll allow you to do ride alongs. 

If you're planning to have them *train* you, that's a whole different box of chips. It involves a significant investment in the trainer's time and resources and, I would hope, a significant fee from you in exchange for the education. 

 

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3 hours ago, inspector57 said:

Back in the dark ages, Texas actually required ride alongs for new inspectors and you had to find a qualified inspector willing to sponsor you. Due to being in a small town and qualified inspectors there not wanting to train their completion, I drove 2 hours each way for 25 "hands on" inspections at his business and then had indirect supervision of 175 inspections by that sponsoring inspector of my inspections. I paid him a fee for each inspection that I did where he reviewed each report. Texas has since changed the licensing requirements many times but I think the direct supervision of an experienced inspector was invaluable.

Not to get into your business but I can't imagine having a significant physical disability and doing inspections. It may not seem like it but it can be very challenging. Be sure to evaluate your abilities and do at least a few ride alongs to see if it is really a fit before investing the time and money. Contrary to what the inspection schools will tell you, this gig is not "easy money" and most inspectors are not truly profitable until about year two or three. Texas has a two year license and a very high percentage of new inspectors never renew their license.  Welcome to the fray!

 

Yeah, I knew this guy, 17 years ago, as deaf as a post, who wanted to be an HI.  What was he thinking?  At the CE's, he couldn't understand a single word!  How in the heck you gonna teach him anything?

Edited by Marc

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We have two "ride alongs" today.  both are ashi school inspector graduates.  one is older one is younger.  one is female and one is male.  one has worked as a roofer.  one has worked as a social worker.  both are welcome at my company and as Marc says " I got xxx years on them".  

Jim's point is important.  We will not train you.  You will not ever participate in the inspection.  I have gotten help from many others and try to help when we can.  My list would takes pages!

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Thanks for the replies.

i understand the difference between a ride-along and training.

However, my state (Virginia) requires: “Completion of 25 home inspections under the direct supervision of a home inspector” to obtain a license.

How do people meet this requirement?

EDIT: I just spoke with AHIT and they arrange the 25 ride-alongs after training. So apparently the wording above refers to this process.

What’s your general opinion of AHIT?

 

Edited by TAH

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8 minutes ago, Les said:

poor

Who do you like for training?

And do they help you with ride-alongs?

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5 hours ago, TAH said:

Who do you like for training?

And do they help you with ride-alongs?

presently no entity other than some company offer on the job training.

who cares about ride alongs other than your state? 

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Some of the schools have four days classroom and four days in the field. Better than all classroom, maybe?

And you're right, only the state cares about ride-alongs. So I need to care also and find a way to make it happen.

Edited by TAH

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I'd suggest you start reading technical books on the various systems in the home. If you don't have a background in the trades (and I suppose even if you do), there is an immense amount of material to learn and comprehend. There are many "textbooks" on inspection and I've read many of them. They're a good appetizer and can help display the breadth of knowledge required, but more detailed texts are extremely helpful. I highly recommend getting a copy of Code Check Complete as well as Electrical Inspections of Existing Dwellings (hey Jim). Carson Dunlop and ASHI have decent training books across all systems that can be purchased used online. I'm sure some of these guys have quality books they could recommend as well.

While you search for a school and/or inspector to shadow, I'd say get going on increasing your knowledge base. I've been licensed for several years and still study my resources regularly. 

 

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32 minutes ago, John Kogel said:

Are there any multi-inspector companies near you? Try to get hired as a new recruit, good way to get started.

Only problem there is I have other issues requiring my time and I can’t go to work anywhere full-time.

My son is going to run my other business but he’ll need a lot of help and my time for awhile yet.

I’m thinking of reaching out to inspectors just outside my service area and offering them some sort of compensation just for dragging me around with them. Can’t decide if it should just be money per inspection or a flat fee or what to offer without causing offense.

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On 10/23/2019 at 10:46 PM, Marc said:

Yeah, I knew this guy, 17 years ago, as deaf as a post, who wanted to be an HI.  What was he thinking?  At the CE's, he couldn't understand a single word!  How in the heck you gonna teach him anything?

I thought of you when writing that post, Marc, which is why I included this " Be sure to evaluate your abilities and do at least a few ride alongs to see if it is really a fit before investing the time and money." Obviously you were able to overcome any limitations. Someone else that could not climb or crawl might have a different outcome. Home inspections are not like we see on TV, just walking through the house with a clip board. Each person needs to be aware of the actual requirements of the profession and their own abilities.

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And, if I decide this is for me I’ll be looking into a crawl space bot and a roof drone.

Drone to eliminate a lot of ladder risks and a bot just because I’m a little claustrophobic. I don’t like really tight crawl spaces. Had one at my old house that was only about 18” and I paid somebody to run some wiring.

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I've been in some ugly crawlspaces and always exit promising myself I will buy a krawl tractor.

I've done some pretty bendy moves to get into and/or crawl through an attic. My knees have not always been happy with me, but I've never needed yoga to improve my flexibility.

I never miss the chance to get up on a roof when its safe to do so, and would never consider the roof inspected if I hadn't touched it with my own hands. They don't yet have a drone that can lift up the shingles and see the nailing pattern.

 

I commend you on your pursuit of training, ride-alongs and a mentor.

Edited by ejager

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On 10/24/2019 at 7:52 AM, Les said:

We have two "ride alongs" today.  both are ashi school inspector graduates.  one is older one is younger.  one is female and one is male.  one has worked as a roofer.  one has worked as a social worker.  both are welcome at my company and as Marc says " I got xxx years on them".  

Update on the two ride alongs the other day.  The one discovered they can't get on roofs.  they thought they could because they had cleaned their own gutters.  they also learned they know nothing nothing nothing about electrical circuits and or systems.  The school taught them to refer/defer to a real tradesperson.  She was a generalist and not to tread on the real professionals territory.

He also could not get around in the attic space, fear of heights, out of breath after couple trips up from basement to first floor.  Not physically suited to this work.  He also was astounded that we would answer questions about the house and its components.  Great attitude and a joy to have lunch with. 

These are anecdotes, but instructive.  neither will recoup the thousands of dollars invested nor will they achieve their state goal(s).  I take no joy reporting this.

I would like to remind the readers that I will not be playing in the NBA this year even though I have had nearly 124 hours of formal basketball training at summer camp. 

PS:  Walter Jowers could take this information and write a short novel or at least twelve weekly columns. 

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16 minutes ago, Les said:

  neither will recoup the thousands of dollars invested nor will they achieve their state goal(s).  I take no joy reporting this.

Our province has education departments in each of the universities.  In only one university one, you have to successfully complete a practicum course that actually puts you in a real classroom (acting somewhat like a teacher's aide), before you are allowed to join the faculty of Education and begin the path towards becoming a teacher:

Quote

The best way to find out if teaching is the career for you is by experiencing what it’s like to be in a classroom. Comprised of campus seminars and a practicum component within the schools, Education 2500 is designed to open your eyes to the realities of this challenging – but rewarding – profession by assigning you to an elementary school classroom for 60 hours (20 mornings).

The other universities teach you you for four years and then throw you out into the teaching world. The different percentage of graduates from each the different schools that are still teaching after just two years reveals the logic of exposing university students to primary school students and classrooms, before the University invests in the student, and before the student invests the time and money in a career that doesn't match their perceived or remembered idea of what a teacher is/does.


Do ride alongs / job shadowing before you commit to the glossy school brochures and promises.

 

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I'd think it would be better to go along with several different inspectors.  You'll be better at choosing what info is accurate and which is bs. Lotsa folklore out there.

I've been part of the training for several dozen fellas.  I don't charge a fee and don't care if they're local.  They're just required to tell everyone they learned from the best.

 

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