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Vehicles that run on french fry oil


StevenT
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Bio diesel, THATS IT!

I looked it up on line and started reading up on it. I seems pretty easy... so far.

With gas at $3.00 a gallon and rising, I'm seriously considering it.

I have a small warehouse that is just begging for a purpose. If I hooked up with a couple of guys like your friend, it could even be profitable. I'll keep you posted.

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Lol.... Oh, I'm still laughing hysterically over this post.

I thought about going down this path myself but used restraint.

This truly is the ultimate recycle. You might end up bigger than a house, but you can both live and drive on French fries. All you need is spuds and vegetable oil.

It's just a darn shame that the nutrition side of it is so bad for you.

Sigh... that had to be the laugh of the week...

Life!.... There's a price for everything!...

Still laughing... must be the Johny Walker Black... Hey! It's the weekend... I earned it.

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H.I. BIOFUELSid="size5">

SAVING THE EARTH, SAVING YOU MONEY

Why not?

Although there is not enough of a supply of "dirty" cooking oil to supply the mass public with fuel, there certainly is enough to supply quite a few.

As a child, I remember a truck used to come to my family's butcher shop and charge a fee to take away the barrels of accumulated fat. They rendered the fat into other bi-products, which they sold.

Diesel fuel is now about $3.00 a gallon, if you could sell it for $1.50 a gallon, I don't think that there would be any problem selling as much of it as you could produce.

I know the govt. would look to get their end ("road use tax"), but if all that you supplied was on site construction equiptment, there would still be a sufficient market and no "road use tax"

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So I typed in bio diesel and it turns out there are many sources for the recipe, doesn't seem that difficult, especially for small production. I think I need Chad to tear himself away from his "super tanker" boiler and help me build something.

Last week, I spent about $80. on gas, and really didn't go anywhere. Now, it's even going higher.

The wheels are turning!

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I had a client that runs his Mercedes on used vegetable oil. There is a kit available that converts almost any diesel vehicle for only around $800. You have to keep the fuel lines and filters heated to keep the veg oil at the same viscosity as diesel. You also have to start the engine with diesel and purge at shutdown.

Any type of veg oil can be used, but he prefers to collect his oil from Asian restaurants. They are glad to give it to him for free as they have to pay for disposal.

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My brother is is a selectman in Newfields, NH and he is trying to get the town to convert a lot of their vehicles to bio diesel. He says that you can do it for about a buck a gallon if you get the stuff for free from restaurants and process it yourself.

Anything that reduces our dependence on foreign oil -even a teensy bit, seems worth trying to me.

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Soybeans are being farmed for bio-diesel, talk about a renewable source. A little thread drift.

My wife and I love Edamame or steamed soybeans. We buy it in 5lbs bags at Sam's Club. I was shocked when I read that they come from China! We (the USA) grow soybeans all over the South and I'm sure in other parts of the country. All they need it water for about 45 days, then you let them dry on the bush for oil, etc., or harvest them while they are still green for food.

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Jim,

I found a place where a set up that makes about 40 gals per batch can be purchased fo under $3k, 300gals for under$7k. I would imagine that I could put something together myself, but the time, effort and equiptment cost involved may make it worth getting the whole system complete. I was under the impression, once the setup built, the cost per gal would be less. But, your brother may be correct.

I understand that in the Pacific, there are gas stations that pump it as a regular selection.

I'm trying to find out more about the downsides. I read somewhere that in <40 degree temperature, it tends to gel, so a gas tank heater in needed, or using it seasonally may me the answer.

There is also a microbe problem, which can clog the fuel lines.

I'm still researching.

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Bravo for Kettlefoods!!!

When my research is completed, depending upon what I find out. If it is feasible, I will try biofuel! Not only for the economics, but because of it's envioronmental impact.

If it works out well, I'll get a larger unit and try to supply others. I have a few friends with diesel vehicles, one with a lumberyard that has about 5 trucks. Who knows!

I used to make wine, I rarely drank it, I used to love to sit in the cellar and smell it. If you were a good friend, I would give you a bottle. I think I would enjoy making biofuel... especially since I can smell it! (Lucky for me, I'm not considering making my own glue!)

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I find the most interesting thing about the topic is that Rudolph Diesel originally invented his engine to run off peanut oil.

From a site on the history of the diesel engine:

He thought that the utilization of a biomass fuel was the real future of his engine. He hoped that it would provide a way for the smaller industries, farmers, and "commonfolk" a means of competing with the monopolizing industries, which controlled all energy production at that time, as well as serve as an alternative for the inefficient fuel consumption of the steam engine.

Sound familiar?

- Jim Katen, Oregon

PS. I've seen those Kettlechip bugs. It's a smart environmental move but it's a brilliant marketing move.

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Originally posted by StevenT

Bravo for Kettlefoods!!!

When my research is completed, depending upon what I find out. If it is feasible, I will try biofuel! Not only for the economics, but because of it's envioronmental impact.

If it works out well, I'll get a larger unit and try to supply others. I have a few friends with diesel vehicles, one with a lumberyard that has about 5 trucks. Who knows!

I used to make wine, I rarely drank it, I used to love to sit in the cellar and smell it. If you were a good friend, I would give you a bottle. I think I would enjoy making biofuel... especially since I can smell it! (Lucky for me, I'm not considering making my own glue!)

Steven,

before you get too carried away with this notion I have to tell you that refined diesel from soya beans and using old cooking oils as fuel source are far from the same thing.

Old cooking oils are far from combustable even at deisel pressures and heat, you need to mix in some virgin fuel to make it work.

And the smell, well lets just say that it is memorable

http://www.sptimes.com/2006/04/17/North ... _bio.shtml

Regards

Gerry

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