Jump to content

GFCI Circuit


as2637
 Share

Recommended Posts

This is my first post and I'd like to thank all of you for the valuable information you share with all inspectors.

I need some feedback - I spoke to a builder who told me that garage door openers as of 2009 will have GFCI protection on the opener circuit.

He also stated he questioned his electrician, his electrician brought documentation to prove it.

Is anyone familiar with this new code? Thanks in advance for the feedback.

Al

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes the 2008 version of the NEC 210.8.A.2 states all receptacles in garages must be GFCI protected. Your state however, may not have adopted or modified that rule. So you also need to check with your state code (if any). Oregon has an exemption 918-305-0130(1)(b) that could be used to exempt garage door openers. Although most door openers since 2008 that I have seen have been GFCI protected.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Since GFCI's can trip so easy, I think it's a bad idea to have them on garage door openers.

A garage door can be an escape route in an emergency. If the circuit is tripped, an escape via garage door will be more complicated.

Just my own opinion, but I don't think that they trip easily. If the newer ones are tripping, there's a problem. Also, garage doors can be manually operated just about as quickly once the release is pulled. That is, as long as they are properly installed, etc.

How many times have you seen someone plug an extension cord into the door opener receptacle? I see it all of the time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is my first post and I'd like to thank all of you for the valuable information you share with all inspectors.

I need some feedback - I spoke to a builder who told me that garage door openers as of 2009 will have GFCI protection on the opener circuit.

He also stated he questioned his electrician, his electrician brought documentation to prove it.

Is anyone familiar with this new code? Thanks in advance for the feedback.

Al

Al,

There's no particular requirement for garage door openers to be protected by a GFCI circuit.

However, there is a requirement in the 2008 NEC that all 15- & 20-amp, 125-volt receptacles in garages be protected by a GFCI. (210.8(A)(2)) so if a garage door opener is plugged into a receptacle in a garage then, yes, it has to be GFCI protected.

As Scott pointed out, anyone who adopts a code can make changes to it so be aware that your state or city might have made exceptions that aren't present in the NEC.

There's a very popular myth out there that motors trip GFCIs and that GFCIs trip all by themselves for no good reason. This is almost never the case. Modern GFCIs are exceedingly reliable devices that pretty much only trip when there's a ground fault. If the thing you plug a GFCI into is causing it to trip, there's probably something wrong with that thing and the GFCI is just doing its job.

As for egress, the IRC specifically says that you can't count a garage as an egress route (311.4.1)

GFCIs are a good thing. Don't fear them.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There have been cases of small children electrocuted by metal garage doors when the garage door opener malfunctioned!

In my opinion, a GFCI (which protects from electrocution) is a good thing to have on a garage door opener outlet! (Code or not...)

It is my understanding that the latest code requires all outlets in a garage to be GFCI. Local states/areas have amendments to some rules or go by older codes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...