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Alternative Building Products


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I was inspired to post this after seeing the vid from the fridge eating machine. This one doesn't eat fridges but you wouldn't want to fall inside it either.

A few years ago (while working as a Millwright) we built this equipment and then spent a couple of months setting up the plant in Mexico. The vid is from the plant. Some might find the end of the vid quite interesting.

Michael Brown

DevWave Software Inc.

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That's really interesting. Do you think you could come up with anything showing the actual application of the product? I'd like to see its actual part it plays in the structure of the building.

They had a vid of building a small house with the board but it doesn't seem to be working.

Ya... Chad like you I've got my hands dirty.

Michael

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Using bagasse for an alternative building product isn't new. The original Celotex was made from it as early as 1920.

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tn_2009121413657_celotex.jpg

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The big difference here was the separation process before making the product. They usually just grind it all up and make the product out of that, but the wax is never wanted and the inside of the cane isn't wanted in this application.

Yes it was something more than simply a wall sheathing it was also for structure... made for developing countries where there is very little wood.

Michael

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Using bagasse for an alternative building product isn't new. The original Celotex was made from it as early as 1920.

Click to Enlarge
tn_2009121413657_celotex.jpg

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Bill I can't read the photo, but am surprised it was from sugar cane. Most of that product was made from wood sawmill waste. I thought.

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Using bagasse for an alternative building product isn't new. The original Celotex was made from it as early as 1920.

Click to Enlarge
tn_2009121413657_celotex.jpg

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Bill I can't read the photo, but am surprised it was from sugar cane. Most of that product was made from wood sawmill waste. I thought.

No sir. The original Celotex was made from the waste of sugar cane processing since the early 1920s. In the mid-late 1930s, the Celotex company diversified into other products including flooring, sheathing, wallboard, some of which contained stuff like reclaimed sawdust and newsprint. I don't know how long they continued manufacturing the original bagasse-based product, but I find it regularly in homes built up until WWII. It has a much different texture, density and sheen than the wood-cellulose boards. I can also usually find a label too.

In the late 70s, Celotex Inc. was revived and manufactured the foam insulating board. Later it became Knight-Celotex and primarily made a sound-insulating product. It went bankrupt this year and the Celotex name sold to Blue Ridge Fiberboards.

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