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I'm just about through my first gallon of Sarco Dual Purpose glazing compound Type M. It cost about 50 bucks delivered and it is as much better than DAP 33 as ledger locks are to lag bolts.

It adheres to the wood and glass and doesn't pull out of the rebate when you tool it. You don't have to keep it at body temperature to obtain a clean reveal and you can pull the knife 3x as fast as you can if you're using DAP 33.

I have restored hundreds and hundreds of windows and I'm upset that I've wasted so much time in the past.

I wrote this because there isn't much out there in the way of glazing compound reviews. It's good enough that I'm going to see about being a distributor and when I do, I'll sell glazing points small enough to use with 1/8" rebates and boiled linseed oil which Sherwin Williams stopped carrying because it's 'out of fashion".

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I'm just about through my first gallon of Sarco Dual Purpose glazing compound Type M. It cost about 50 bucks delivered and it is as much better than DAP 33 as ledger locks are to lag bolts.

It adheres to the wood and glass and doesn't pull out of the rebate when you tool it. You don't have to keep it at body temperature to obtain a clean reveal and you can pull the knife 3x as fast as you can if you're using DAP 33.

I have restored hundreds and hundreds of windows and I'm upset that I've wasted so much time in the past.

I wrote this because there isn't much out there in the way of glazing compound reviews. It's good enough that I'm going to see about being a distributor and when I do, I'll sell glazing points small enough to use with 1/8" rebates and boiled linseed oil which Sherwin Williams stopped carrying because it's 'out of fashion".

You won't sell much unless you can stop the repugnant trend of desecrating historic buildings with vinyl windows.
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I'm just about through my first gallon of Sarco Dual Purpose glazing compound Type M. It cost about 50 bucks delivered and it is as much better than DAP 33 as ledger locks are to lag bolts.

It adheres to the wood and glass and doesn't pull out of the rebate when you tool it. You don't have to keep it at body temperature to obtain a clean reveal and you can pull the knife 3x as fast as you can if you're using DAP 33.

I have restored hundreds and hundreds of windows and I'm upset that I've wasted so much time in the past.

I wrote this because there isn't much out there in the way of glazing compound reviews. It's good enough that I'm going to see about being a distributor and when I do, I'll sell glazing points small enough to use with 1/8" rebates and boiled linseed oil which Sherwin Williams stopped carrying because it's 'out of fashion".

You won't sell much unless you can stop the repugnant trend of desecrating historic buildings with vinyl windows.

As much as I hate people replacing with vinyl is thought of the tons of crown glass, broad sheet glass and cylinder glass unceremoniously dumped in land fills- or worse, ending up on some etsy page. I spent about six hours last week taking sash apart and inventorying some nice big pieces of cylinder glass. My wife does not share my enthusiasm when I arrive with 60 windows in my truck.

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My modest 1870 farm house had original sash in 17 of the 21 windows when I bought it. Those that weren't original; two had lumberyard replacement sash, one had a cheap vinyl replacement in it, and one had been replaced with a 1960 Andersen Flexivent. My winter heating bills exceeded my monthly mortgage.

I replaced most of the windows with Kolbe and Kolbe sash kits, duplicating the original divided light pattern but adding high performance glass that meets today's Energy Star (I started in 2006). I added a couple new windows and replaced the Flexivent with new prime windows to match the kits. Same for my addition. I preserved the character of my old but not historic house and conserved enough energy that I can actually afford to live in it.

I do get your point though. One of the Kittenger houses in Buffalo has vinyl replacements in the dormers. Cheap ones. A fact I pointed out to the preservationist running the tour. He hadn't noticed before.

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I wish I had taken a photo of it but an early 20th century home I was looking at for purchase had two sets of sashes in the front wall windows. One in front of the other. Each set was single hung. All original to the house, as far as I can tell. Never seen that before or since. It's still there and unsold so I may pass by and ask owner if I can take a few photos.

Anyone seen that before?

Marc

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