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Way overdue. The guy said my pole garage would be done in 6 weeks. We are at 5 months and counting. Still need to pour slab inside and put vehicle doors on.

I'm tired of playing nice and tired of waiting. Each time I call he says the end of next week. It comes and goes and he doesn't even call to explain.

I've given him about $12,500. There is $7000 left to pay. I think we are even as far as money vs work done at this point.

Should I hire an attorney in hopes that it will get him moving? What do you suggest I do?

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I assume there is nothing in your contract regarding delays or completion date? Anything in the state contractor's laws about this?

If he is avoiding you that is a bad sign. I would try to find him at his home, office, or job site and ask him in person why there is a delay. That would be a good time to mention that you may need to take further steps. Meanwhile, I would send a letter (return receipt requested) asking when he is going to finish. I would mention that weather will soon be a factor in pouring the slab.

Also, maybe you would be better off having someone else finish. But I have been involved in a few cases where clients fired contractors when they would not finish a job and the contractor has sued to get paid. Go figure. You have to be real careful contractually in these situations.

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Typical. His supplier won't extend him credit anymore. He needs to sign up a new job with a big deposit to use for the materials to complete your project.

Rob Peter to pay Paul = a sore Peter.

Shoot!, If that's the case, send the concrete and overhead door subs down here and I'll pay them directly.

But I totally hear ya. We suspected he had cash flow problems.

I guess the thing I want to know is, how do I get his ass in gear? I'd love to pay him as soon as he's done.

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I assume there is nothing in your contract regarding delays or completion date? Anything in the state contractor's laws about this?

If he is avoiding you that is a bad sign. I would try to find him at his home, office, or job site and ask him in person why there is a delay. That would be a good time to mention that you may need to take further steps. Meanwhile, I would send a letter (return receipt requested) asking when he is going to finish. I would mention that weather will soon be a factor in pouring the slab.

Also, maybe you would be better off having someone else finish. But I have been involved in a few cases where clients fired contractors when they would not finish a job and the contractor has sued to get paid. Go figure. You have to be real careful contractually in these situations.

Nothing in the contract about time line. My mistake there.

He'll answer his phone so getting him in a conversation is not the problem. Maybe I should ask him if he would agree to calling it even and I hire other to finish.

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Sometimes there's a weird thing with contractors that disappear. They kind of get "embarrassed". They know they're dorks, and hide from reality.

I'm guessing a combination of the usual stuff. Out of money, doesn't know how to manage, he disappears, and you get to track him down.

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Costco sells the very brand of overhead doors he was going to install. I'll bet Costco would be cheaper anyway. Two 8x9 doors with openers installed. What would you guess, $2500?

How about a 24x36 4" slab? Prep and gravel is already in place. Lay mesh and pour is all that needs to be done. How much would that run me?

What do you think of fiber mesh instead of wire mesh?

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They're trying to minimize shrinkage cracks in their too wet concrete. Fluffing up a placement with fiber is much easier than placing low slump concrete.

Steel mesh really isn't necessary in a light duty garage floor if you've got your stone placed and compacted satisfactorily. Everyone does it and they don't know why. Almost no one gets it in the right location in the slab, so it rarely provides any benefit.

Put your big work into prep and you can do without either fiber or iron.

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Can the closed height of overhead doors be adjusted after installation?

I'm wondering if I can put the doors on before the slab goes in, then fine tune the closed position after the slab goes in.

Yes. It's in the setting of the two adjustment screws on the auto closer. Download the manual for 'most any closer and you'll see. I've done that adjustment myself on a few doors.

Marc

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First thing I'm gonna do is rent a vibratory whacker and make sure the gravel nice and compacted.

How thick is that base? Small pea gravel?

Marc

About 4" base of #57 stone.

That's a good base. I'd still install the steel mesh but not pay extra for the fiber, just to keep the quality of the slab on par with the rest of the building.

Marc

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Placing the doors before the floor requires competent installers for both. From the pics I would consider it, based on your comments in this thread I'd wait.

I wouldn't get too excited about it. There are plenty of options for making adjustments.

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