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  • 2 weeks later...

Hydrogen peroxide is better than bleach.

Really? Why? What concentration?

Really? Yes. Why? No toxic fumes. Concentration? Three percent is fine. Put it in a spray bottle, spray, let set for 10 minutes, scrub, then wipe clean.

HELLO,

One reason is that bleach cannot totally murder mold developing in permeable materials. The chlorine in bleach cannot enter into porous surfaces for example, drywall or wood. The chlorine is left on the surface of porous materials and only the water component of the bleach is absorbed into the material, giving more moisture for the mold to feed on.

A portion of the mold at first surface may be killed however the roots of the mold are left in place importance the mold before long returns, abandoning you in a cycle of rehashed dying. Maybe this is the reason a few individuals accept that spraying bleach on mold doesn't affect it however rather just bleaches its shading so you can no more see it.

Another weakness of bleach is that it can harm the materials it's utilized on as it is an unforgiving, corrosive chemical. Chlorine bleach also gives off harsh fumes and it even produces toxic gas when mixed with ammonia. There are more secure options, for example, borax or vinegar which don't create risk fumes or leave behind toxic residue.

Thanks

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  • 1 month later...

. . . One reason is that bleach cannot totally murder mold developing in permeable materials. The chlorine in bleach cannot enter into porous surfaces for example, drywall or wood. The chlorine is left on the surface of porous materials and only the water component of the bleach is absorbed into the material, giving more moisture for the mold to feed on. . . .

Does anyone out there have a reference that supports this claim? Sounds like BS.

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It doesn't say precisely not to use it on porous surfaces. I've used it on my unpainted bath walls and it worked without problems.

1. Avoid prolonged breathing of vapor. Use in well-ventilated areas. Open windows and turn on fans before use. If vapors bother you, leave the room. For sensitive skin or prolonged use, wear gloves.

2. Directions for removing mildew stains with Tilex? Mold & Mildew Remover:

a. Turn sprayer nozzle to spray position.

b. Spray on glazed ceramic tile, grout, tubs, fiberglass, shower doors, vinyl shower curtains, sinks and no-wax floors. Allow mildew stains to disappear, then rinse well.

c. Rinse immediately after use on rubber or vinyl, bathmats and items such as shower curtains.

3. To disinfect and kill mold and mildew on hard nonporous surfaces: Spray surface such as tile until thoroughly wet, let stand five minutes and rinse. For heavy soil, pre-cleaning is required. This product kills Staphylococcus aureus (Staph), Streptococcus pyogenes (Strep) and Trichophyton mentagrophytes (Athlete's Foot Fungus).

4. Do not use on wood or painted surfaces, or on fabric. Avoid prolonged contact with metal and old porcelain.

5. Do not combine with household cleaning products. Mixing household chemicals can release hazardous gases.

Marc

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. . . One reason is that bleach cannot totally murder mold developing in permeable materials. The chlorine in bleach cannot enter into porous surfaces for example, drywall or wood. The chlorine is left on the surface of porous materials and only the water component of the bleach is absorbed into the material, giving more moisture for the mold to feed on. . . .

Does anyone out there have a reference that supports this claim? Sounds like BS.

I got a very similar story from a PHD mycologist at a CE class. He also gave me a sales pitch on air sampling equipment, and a certificate stating I am an expert mold inspector...so take it with a grain of salt.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Timbor's label states that it does not treat or prevent mold. Boracare data sheet has no information specific to the treatment of mold.

Foster's products such as their 40-80 or Fiberlock's Shockwave on the other hand are EPA registered and specified for the treatment of mold.

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