Jump to content

Grandfathering


Recommended Posts

I really hate grandfathering. I understand the reason of it, but I think this is severely abused. This last week alone I've had agents tell me that a garage door opener using an extension cord 'Is grand fathered". A truss repair (web was snapped in half like someone stepped on it) is grandfathered. (BTW, the handyman service certified in writing that the truss was not load bearing, lol) Most agents use the age of the house and not the item to claim grandfathering.

I just thought I'd start a discussion about the abuse and how people handle it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tell 'em they can argue that all they want with the local AHJ, but it means nothing to a home inspector. We don't deal in grandfathering, the AHJ's do. We don't enforce codes, we find and report safety issues.

Or better yet, ignore the realtor and speak directly to the client about why that supposedly grandfathered item is a safety concern for his family.

Brian G.

HI's Grandfather Nothing [^]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I handle it much like Brian does.That is, I dont handle it. Granfdfathering means nothing to me (or my client after I explain it to them). I dont talk much with zoids in any case. Nothing against them, it's just none of their business.

Tim

I'm on my way to see 'Hulk' with my grandson. That's the only kind of grandfathering that means anything.[:-party]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use:

====

If the response to an area of concern or a recommendation in my report is, "Well, they didn't have that (or they didn't do that) when the house was built," or that it was "grandfathered", I usually know that. When it comes to home repairs, "Grandfathered" is a term often tossed out by people who care more about their wallet than about you and your family's safety: as in "That 8 inch gap in the balcony railing doesn't need to be fixed because it's grandfathered. It was okay to do it that way when this house was built." Is it going to comfort you, when your child falls through that gap and is badly injured, that the size of the gap was "Grandfathered"? All "Grandfathered" really means is that no one can "force" you to change it, repair it, or replace it. Only you can choose what level of risk you want to live with. People with young children who could fall thru that 8 inch gap "should" choose to ensure it is changed to a safer gap but no one is going to force a change except you.

Since whatever issue was "grandfathered", our knowledge has increased considerably concerning safety in the home. I believe that you should be safe in your home and that taking care of your home should be as easy as possible. So I will recommend things that they didn't have or do years ago simply to keep you safe or help you take care of your home. What's most important to me is that you and your family are as safe as possible in your home. Only you can choose what level of risk you want to live with and expose your family to.

======

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, a lot of this stuff that's described as grandfathered was never approved in the first place, so it can't be legally noncompliant in the 2nd place.

It's easier doing it Walter's way. Make accurate and compelling observations and let fools argue w/facts.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used to get pulled into these arguments with people who disputed my reports. Now I figure that since my signature and license number are on the report that's enough - people can take it or leave it. I'm not enforcing anything, I'm only providing my opinions. Besides, all those people who squawk generally will back down if you ask them to put their opinion in writing and stand behind it.

Someone wants to differ they can knock themselves out. I've learned that I can't always get clients to listen to my advice and that spending effort to do so can be a waste of my time.

And once in a while I am rewarded when I hear that the client later got hosed after he listened to some other advice. That kind of news comes too infrequently.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And once in a while I am rewarded when I hear that the client later got hosed after he listened to some other advice. That kind of news comes too infrequently.

If my client ever got hosed, I'd feel terrible; I didn't do my job. I know, I know, you can lead a horse to water....

It's just that they do pay us to do a job; if they didn't listen or follow advice, I wouldn't feel 'rewarded'.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They don't listen or follow your advice quite a bit. Ever go back and do it for a new buyer when you inspected it for the seller a few years ago.

Find hardly anything has been taken care of.

As you said, you can lead a horse to water, you can shove their head under the water, but you can't make em drink. (Though if you hold em down long enough they may breathe some water.)

I tell em. I put it in the report. From there on, it's their baby!

-

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's never happened to me, but if I told a client about a problem and the realtor was standing there telling them it okay because it was grandfathered, I couldn't let that BS stand unchallenged. If I say nothing my client may well think the realtor is right.

I could squash any such BS in 30 seconds or less. I can spare the 30 seconds.

Brian G.

Oppose the Lies [:-thumbu]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...