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lintel too short?


John Dirks Jr
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I could not see these lentils extend into the masonry. Is it possible that the builder notched the ends so the mortar would hide the extension over the edge? It looked like they stopped right at the corner.

How should I approach this?

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Lintel. Lentil's a legume.

Tell the folks the lintel looks like it stops short of the supporting masonry; it could settle/move/inadequately support, etc. It looks like someone put a little bead or tuck of mortar in there; someone trying to mimic a lintel in mortar?

How old's the house? You could tell them it lacks flashing and weeps.

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Lintel. Lentil's a legume.

Tell the folks the lintel looks like it stops short of the supporting masonry; it could settle/move/inadequately support, etc. It looks like someone put a little bead or tuck of mortar in there; someone trying to mimic a lintel in mortar?

How old's the house? You could tell them it lacks flashing and weeps.

The house is still within it's 1 year warranty period.

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I thought about chipping but that might have knocked out more than intended so I decided not to. I feel pretty good about calling the suspicion from what I saw and recommending follow up by a qualified contractor.

The weep holes were there. In this area at least, I've seen partially constructed veneer where they use a rubber like membrane instead of the through wall flashings. It hangs down the wall and curls under and between the mortar joints just below the weep holes. In a completed structure, you cant see it. In the partially constructed units I had seen prior, I could look behind the veneer from the corner of the structure and see all the ties and membranes.

Even though I cant see those details, it doesn't mean they're not there.

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Even though I cant see those details, it doesn't mean they're not there.

Well, yes it does. It's called through wall flashing for a reason. If you can't see the "details", they're not details.

Where's the end dams?

The mason did his own take on the methodology, similar to what they do here. Tell folks it's wrong, explain why, and reference the multitude of material out there to support your statements. If they want to disagree, show them the reference material. If they still disagree, that's their prerogative.

Yes, Grace can be used for flashing.

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I'm with Brandon. In the second photo, it absolutely looks like the lintel extends well into the mortar joint and was slightly glazed for aesthetic reasons. As for the weephole, that's what they look like around here when installed post-construction with a drill and a masonry bit.

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  • 4 weeks later...

When you see weeps like this, it usually isn't done with a drill and bit. Nylon cord was laid into the masonry and pulled out just before the mortar actually sets too hard. It's really all that's needed as opposed to leaving out entire head joints. And, it's a lot better way to ensure that the drain path isn't clogged up by mortar droppings during installation.

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