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Did you already apply it? If not, might consider some of the high quality premix. I used a premixed ready-use grout that is stain and mildew resistant and doesn't need sealing. Costs a lot more but worth it IMHO, especially for such a small area, it's worth it. I don't recall the brand right off but bought it at Lowe's.

Otherwise, it's important to seal it. Helps prevent staining and discoloration.

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Too big a joint; nothing you use will do much. Read the label; for it to work, you have to reapply every couple weeks.

I've never used sealer. Ever. Good tile work doesn't need it because you've done everything else right. Be prepared for a chorus of folks telling you I'm wrong, and it's absolutely necessary.

There's no such thing as white grout.

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In the mid 1990s I did some experiments with grout sealers. I had long suspected that they didn't do squat so I made up a bunch of samples, leaving some bare, and sealing others with several different sealers. I then applied various things to them to try to stain them.

Bottom line, the sealers didn't do squat. In some cases, they actually made things worse.

Now, maybe the sealers have gotten better over the last 20 years. It might be interesting to repeat the experiment.

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Interesting. About 10 years ago the sealer helped on our kitchen in our last house with no stains in the grout with various spills of spaghetti sauce and such on the white counter grout and light tan floor grout, but could have just been luck I suppose. Do grout manufacturers not recommend sealing for bag mix grout still?

Either way, the stuff I went with this time that specifically says there's no need to seal it looks like good stuff. Time will tell.

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I endeavor to choose tile that a grey grout complements. That way, I can start off with a nice dirty grey color and save myself the angst of watching traffic patterns or stains developing. Next to grey, medium to dark brown is best. I grouted my basket weave bathroom floor and a client's hexagon bathroom floor with grey thinset. They're holding up beautifully.

If you must use a lighter color, use a latex modifier instead of water.

If you're up for a challenge and the area isn't too big, use an epoxy- don't be deluded about cleaning the haze off the following day though.

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I endeavor to choose tile that a grey grout complements. That way, I can start off with a nice dirty grey color and save myself the angst of watching traffic patterns or stains developing. Next to grey, medium to dark brown is best. I grouted my basket weave bathroom floor and a client's hexagon bathroom floor with grey thinset. They're holding up beautifully.

If you must use a lighter color, use a latex modifier instead of water.

If you're up for a challenge and the area isn't too big, use an epoxy- don't be deluded about cleaning the haze off the following day though.

Approx 170 sq ft. including walls and floor with a combination of 3/16 and 1/8 grout widths. What are the challenges? Is the product performance over time worth the extra effort? We are using a tan/brown color called haystack (or similar) since other brands might have a different name for it.

For us, price is not much of an issue but ease of installation is.

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The epoxy isn't too hard, it's just important that you clean it well during the "working time" (which is really about 45 minutes, not 80 minutes)

I just finished a large floor with irregular 3x16 tiles in a herringbone pattern. It was the most challenging tile job I've ever done.

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Do what Fabry said. Use a darker grout. I always use a latex admix out of habit.

If you're looking for ease of installation, cut your joint to about 1/2 of what it is now; 3/16" is a really fat joint.

The tile work I like the most has almost no grout lines, maybe 1/16". Of course, you have to choose tile that looks good with a minimal grout line.

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I just "finished" a tile project with 6"x24", 1/16" grout lines. Some were a bit larger on the floor areas and curbs. I hired it done and found that most tile guys are idiots, can't tell time and can't measure. I could write a book!

I am not sealing it. Interestingly I learned that Latticrete does not recommend an admix, except for exterior applications. We used a dark chocolate color grout.

This is my first personal project that I contracted out. Even at my advanced age, I learned that me and my wife are not good clients.

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For tile spacers, I use pennies. For wide seams, 2 or 3 pennies taped with electrical tape. I use lots of spacers and get a nice uniform grout line that way.

I cut tile dry with a cutting blade on my Skilsaw. Wear eye pro and clamp the tile to a table top. Since I discovered the cutting blade, my tiling has gotten much more precise. Since I'm not breaking and snapping and cursing much anymore, my wife keeps finding more tile work for me to do. Crap, it's a double-edged sword.

Buy the better, more expensive grout. They say the new products don't need sealer.

I often tell people to clean the grout and use sealer if they are buying an old floor or tub surround with old, dirty grout. Maybe that's a wasted effort, but it gives them hope. [:)]

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I endeavor to choose tile that a grey grout complements. That way, I can start off with a nice dirty grey color and save myself the angst of watching traffic patterns or stains developing. Next to grey, medium to dark brown is best. I grouted my basket weave bathroom floor and a client's hexagon bathroom floor with grey thinset. They're holding up beautifully.

If you must use a lighter color, use a latex modifier instead of water.

If you're up for a challenge and the area isn't too big, use an epoxy- don't be deluded about cleaning the haze off the following day though.

so you grouted with grey thinset adhesive?

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I endeavor to choose tile that a grey grout complements. That way, I can start off with a nice dirty grey color and save myself the angst of watching traffic patterns or stains developing. Next to grey, medium to dark brown is best. I grouted my basket weave bathroom floor and a client's hexagon bathroom floor with grey thinset. They're holding up beautifully.

If you must use a lighter color, use a latex modifier instead of water.

If you're up for a challenge and the area isn't too big, use an epoxy- don't be deluded about cleaning the haze off the following day though.

so you grouted with grey thinset adhesive?

Works awesome.

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It's true. There's lots of times where I put the thin set on a tad thick, set the tile so it squishes up through the joint. Let it set, a small touchup with more thin set, job done. It works good.

Yes, I know, heresy. But, it works good.

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It's another on of my strong arguments for using grey grout in the first place. It all ends up grey anyway.

I will grudgingly concede that haystack type colors can work OK for a long time if you're obsessive compulsive about cleaning, sealer application, and all the stuff that makes living with tile a total pain in the ass.

The whole idea of tile is minimal maintenance for a few hundred years. Why screw that up with fancy grout? Design around the characteristics of tile; minimal grout lines, as little grout as possible.

The only people that think colored grout is cool are suburban housewife decorator types, downtown high end tile stores, or noobs. Start with a nice dirty grey. It all gets there pretty quick anyway.

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If you're looking for ease of installation, cut your joint to about 1/2 of what it is now; 3/16" is a really fat joint.

The tile work I like the most has almost no grout lines, maybe 1/16". Of course, you have to choose tile that looks good with a minimal grout line.

I'm with you on the thin to win, in most cases. But, before this guy gets spooked, 3/16 is not a really fat joint when you're working with big wall tile. It's done all of the time with the clothes line method of spacing, and it looks great.

I'm also in the no sealer corner.

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I agree it can look great. Skinny looks greater.

I've used all manner of rope for spacer; one doesn't have to use clothesline. I've got some yacht braid a hair less than 3/32" that works great.

Chicago is a tile city. Quite literally, I almost never see plastic or vinyl floor, and pretty much never, ever see plastic anything in a bathroom. All the old joints with the beautiful euro tiles all have skinny joints; think of all the subway tile out there....skinny joints.

There's only one place I like a really fat joint........[:-angel]

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I don't grout between the tub or shower pan and the bottom course of tile; it's just going to go moldy and/or crack and fall out of the joint. Another argument for dirty grey grout; there's dirty grey caulk to match it perfectly.

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I don't grout between the tub or shower pan and the bottom course of tile; it's just going to go moldy and/or crack and fall out of the joint. Another argument for dirty grey grout; there's dirty grey caulk to match it perfectly.

Yeah, I planned on not grouting at the tub to wall junction.

I was mainly inquiring about the vertical corners of the tub surround walls. Is it ok to grout there or is a flexible material better? I think I read it in a DIY forum somewhere or maybe I dreamed it up. I would prefer to just use the same grout there since it will match better than a different (but claimed to be same color) material. I know it sounds silly because I see grout in these corners all the time. I just wondered what the deal was with that recommendation and if it's really needed there (vertical inside corners).

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