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PEX Pipe Spec


randynavarro
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Originally posted by randynavarro

I've got two different PEX install guides and neither specifically mentions fastening the rough-out/stub-outs for hot and cold water under sinks securely to the wall framing.

I have Zurn specs and the 128 page guide published by NAHB/PATH/PPFA.

Anyone have any other sources that sez stub-outs need to be fastened?

What about:

UPC 313.1 All piping passing under or through walls shall be proteced from breakage.

UPC 313.2 All piping in connection with a plumbing system shall be so installed that piping or connections will not be subject to undo strains or stresses. . .

UPC 313.5 Piping subject to corrosion, erosion, or mechanical damage shall be protected in an approved manner.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Originally posted by randynavarro

I've got two different PEX install guides and neither specifically mentions fastening the rough-out/stub-outs for hot and cold water under sinks securely to the wall framing.

I have Zurn specs and the 128 page guide published by NAHB/PATH/PPFA.

Anyone have any other sources that sez stub-outs need to be fastened?

This is from Zurn:

Stub Outs Through Walls

Most Zurn PEX runs will terminate with some sort of stub-out fitting

because the depth of a standard 2 x 4 wall is not sufficient to allow the

Zurn PEX tube to be bent with a recommended bend unless a metal bend

support is used. Zurn offers a metal bend support with a face plate,

QMBS3WB, that is ideal for this purpose. Be sure the local code allows

PEX stub-outs through walls. Zurn also offers several other fittings for

stub-outs.

Copper stub-out elbows are available with either a 3/8" or 1/2" crimp

connection to the Zurn PEX tube in the wall. The portion of the elbow

that comes through the wall is 1/2" nominal copper tube (5/8" O.D.).

Zurn drop ear elbows are available with either a 3/8" or 1/2" crimp

connection to the Zurn PEX tube in the wall. These fittings have a

1/2" female pipe thread to allow the use of a threaded nipple to

come through the wall.

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  • 2 years later...

Nah,

I hardly ever see copper stubouts on PEX. Around here they either use those sweeping bends and just let the end hang out of the wall or they put an elbow just behind the wall and use either PEX or copper to come through the face of the wall. I've yet to see the molded and chromed plastic stub-out covers designed to go over PEX stub-outs to disguise them.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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I'm regurgitating this thread in the hopes that a prohibition against PEX stub outs in 2X4 stud walls is now in force. Anyone aware of one?

Marc

..............why?

Greg

Because......

Nolan posted some pictures I've never seen before and learned from.

Digging it back up for review ain't a bad thing.

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I'm regurgitating this thread in the hopes that a prohibition against PEX stub outs in 2X4 stud walls is now in force. Anyone aware of one?

Marc

..............why?

Greg

Because......

Nolan posted some pictures I've never seen before and learned from.

Digging it back up for review ain't a bad thing.

...........not questioning the issue of bringing back old threads..........I was wondering why the concern with Pex stub-outs

Greg

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Marc,

Here are some images I took recently at a phase inspection of a condo.

These are the typical transitions i see over here ... D/FW.

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tn_201112161752_IMGP8502.jpg

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Those pictures lok better than most of the pex jobs ive ever seen,still not allowed to use it in the city of Omaha though last I heard
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Few more images that go with the ones I posted above.

These below are of the PEX Manifold distribution panel on the interior garage wall.

This one has been nicely done ... compared to some I've seen.

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tn_20111217102443_IMGP8740.jpg

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Nice work,not sure about about the location though unless youre in a really warm part of the country
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Few more images that go with the ones I posted above.

These below are of the PEX Manifold distribution panel on the interior garage wall.

This one has been nicely done ... compared to some I've seen.

Click to Enlarge
tn_20111217102443_IMGP8740.jpg

63.04?KB

Click to Enlarge
tn_20111217102510_IMGP8741.jpg

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tn_20111217102535_IMGP8742.jpg

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It has a Fabry touch to it.[;)]

Marc

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  • 1 year later...

I stumbled upon this cite from the Louisiana Plumbing Code which is a modified version of the 1994 Standard Plumbing Code:

611.1.6 The maximum recommended spacing between horizontal supports for cross-linked polyethylene (PEX) tubing is 32 inches (813 mm) for nominal tubing diameters from 1/4 inch through 2 inch. It should not be rigidly secured to a joist or stud but should be secured with smooth plastic strap hangers which permit ease of movement during expansion lor contraction. Valve and fixture connections to which PEX pipe is connected shall be rigidly anchored.

Doesn't this clearly prohibit Pex stub-outs?

Here's my motivation, from yesterday's inspection. It's a new construction. Every stub-out in the house is Pex:

Click to Enlarge
tn_201322094724_031.jpg

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Marc

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I stumbled upon this cite from the Louisiana Plumbing Code which is a modified version of the 1994 Standard Plumbing Code:

611.1.6 The maximum recommended spacing between horizontal supports for cross-linked polyethylene (PEX) tubing is 32 inches (813 mm) for nominal tubing diameters from 1/4 inch through 2 inch. It should not be rigidly secured to a joist or stud but should be secured with smooth plastic strap hangers which permit ease of movement during expansion lor contraction. Valve and fixture connections to which PEX pipe is connected shall be rigidly anchored.

Doesn't this clearly prohibit Pex stub-outs?

Here's my motivation, from yesterday's inspection. It's a new construction. Every stub-out in the house is Pex:

Click to Enlarge
tn_201322094724_031.jpg

32.15?KB

Marc

........I would say that it cleary suggests the use of a pex stub-out. The stub-out being the "required rigidly anchored connection".

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