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Technical name for....


Robert Jones
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I call it a trim ring

You can call it that, it's a free North America. My son used to call the masonary [sic] stack that channels smoke away from the home a chimmelstick'. The only down side to that was no one knew what the hell he was talking about.

Say trim ring to me and I think of a stainless steel ring surrounding a baby moon whose main purpose is to conceal wheel weights.

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I love these silly semantics discussions. Our job is to effectively communicate with our clients, so you could call it a do-hicky as long as they know what the hell you are talking about. That said I would, and do so regularly, use escutcheon.

I recently had a builder return a patio door handle that he received damaged. I called my supplier and told the factory rep that the escutcheon was dented, there were several seconds of silence before he asked,"so you need a new handle?" Even people who should know this stuff don't.

Tom

Oh yeah, baby moons and trim rings are sweet!

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As it turns out, that thingy is actually called a flange.

Not an escutcheon.

For door hardware, it's a rosette.

If I'm not mistaken again, the difference would be, that an escutcheon is also part of the frame work of the componant.

A rosette or flange is in fact, a trim ring.

Google escutcheon vs flange. They are different parts.

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Flange \Flange\ (fl[a^]nj), n. [Prov. E. flange to project, flanch a projection. See Flanch, Flank.]

1. An external or internal rib, or rim, for strength, as the flange of an iron beam; or for a guide, as the flange of a car wheel (see Car wheel.); or for attachment to another object, as the flange on the end of a pipe, steam cylinder, etc. --Knight. [1913 Webster]

Main Entry: es·cutch·eon

Pronunciation: \is-#712;k#601;-ch#601;nFunction: noun

Etymology: Middle English escochon, from Anglo-French escuchoun, from Vulgar Latin *scution-, scutio, from Latin scutum shield — more at esquire

Date: 15th century

1 : a defined area on which armorial bearings are displayed and which usually consists of a shield

2 : a protective or ornamental plate or flange (as around a keyhole)

3 : the part of a ship's stern on which the name is displayed

I'm pretty sure I'll still be calling it an escutcheon.

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Flange \Flange\ (fl[a^]nj), n. [Prov. E. flange to project, flanch a projection. See Flanch, Flank.]

1. An external or internal rib, or rim, for strength, as the flange of an iron beam; or for a guide, as the flange of a car wheel (see Car wheel.); or for attachment to another object, as the flange on the end of a pipe, steam cylinder, etc. --Knight. [1913 Webster]

Main Entry: es·cutch·eon

Pronunciation: \is-#712;k#601;-ch#601;nFunction: noun

Etymology: Middle English escochon, from Anglo-French escuchoun, from Vulgar Latin *scution-, scutio, from Latin scutum shield — more at esquire

Date: 15th century

1 : a defined area on which armorial bearings are displayed and which usually consists of a shield

2 : a protective or ornamental plate or flange (as around a keyhole)

3 : the part of a ship's stern on which the name is displayed

I'm pretty sure I'll still be calling it an escutcheon.

I saw all of that too. The kid digging through the parts catalog won't.

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I just push it back in place so I don't have to say anything....[:-tong2]

Wayne G

It ain't a flange, it's an escutcheon. Trim rings go on recessed light cans and automobile hubcaps; it ain't a trim ring.

When we start mixing up definitions in this extremely "part description" intensive gig that we do, we confuse everyone, including our customers and ourselves.

If it's OK to change words around, then it's OK to call a GEC a wiring safety device, or a window sash a frame.

It's not OK to make up our own words; if we do that, then nothing means anything, and we're behaving like all those doof's that we excoriate on a daily basis.

And, I do exactly what Wayne does. That's a smart HI.

"Words mean things".............Walter Jowers

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Gary, I did the google that you suggested. It reconciles with DavidLord's post near the top of the thread.

Marc

My bad, Marc. Google shower head parts instead, and look through the catalogs. Then do the same for locksets.

What triggered this for me was, thinking about the different locksets I've installed in schools and hospitals Ect. The plates on a mortise lockset are also part of the assembly. They're escutcheons. The part that the rosette covers on a standard type of lockset is also an escutcheon.

It's more about correcting my error in saying they were the same.

Call them what you want. The manufacturers do.

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I just push it back in place so I don't have to say anything....[:-tong2]

Wayne G

It ain't a flange, it's an escutcheon. Trim rings go on recessed light cans and automobile hubcaps; it ain't a trim ring.

When we start mixing up definitions in this extremely "part description" intensive gig that we do, we confuse everyone, including our customers and ourselves.

If it's OK to change words around, then it's OK to call a GEC a wiring safety device, or a window sash a frame.

It's not OK to make up our own words; if we do that, then nothing means anything, and we're behaving like all those doof's that we excoriate on a daily basis.

And, I do exactly what Wayne does. That's a smart HI.

"Words mean things".............Walter Jowers

I totally agree, but I can't even begin to count how many times the use of the word escutcheon specifically has gone right over people's heads, including people who sell the damn things. It elicits the 'deer in the headlights' look, or the giggles like I just said a dirty word in the company of children.

Most people don't know what an escutcheon is, and except for us HI's, the rest don't care.

Tom

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When we start mixing up definitions in this extremely "part description" intensive gig that we do, we confuse everyone, including our customers and ourselves.

If it's OK to change words around, then it's OK to call a GEC a wiring safety device, or a window sash a frame.

It's not OK to make up our own words; if we do that, then nothing means anything, and we're behaving like all those doof's that we excoriate on a daily basis.

And, I do exactly what Wayne does. That's a smart HI.

"Words mean things".............Walter Jowers

Didn't see this earlier.

Perfect!

Google shower head parts and see if you find one of these in any of the catalogs that's called anything but a flange. Then look at the escutcheons. Different animal.

Hmm. Yup, "It's not OK to make up our own words;"

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Call me a curmudgeon if it makes you happy, but I've always called it an escutcheon and always will. That's what it is! Frankly, I'm damned tired of being told that I should (in effect) "dumb down" reports to cater to the least educated among my clients. As I see it, escutcheon is a useful word not only applied to plumbing trim. Come on now...would it kill a buyer to Google the word if they are not familiar with it? Even that would be optional...after all, there is (presumably) a photo in the report that shows the part in question.

Sheesh...

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