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This thread has me wondering how many inspectors have desktop computers at their homes/ offices? I've never owned a desktop; it's all laptops.

You kids . . .

I can work on a laptop, but not efficiently. As I pound the keys, the whole thing shakes. I need a keyboard on a solid surface to take the pounding. My fingers still remember the force necessary to work the old Royal that I learned to type on.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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By my count, I'm on the 6th desktop in 15 years and only the second notebook. I've gone through more than 20 keyboards, though. Like Jim, I learned on a manual typewriter - an old Underwood - and I really pound the keys once I get my speed up.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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I can type much faster than I can speak with the right laptop keyboard. Shoot, sometimes my hands type faster than I can think, and I've got to go back and erase random words that muscle memory have made up while waiting on my real brain to spit something out to my fingers.

Not so much with a clunky desktop keyboard. I can barely type on one anymore, and I'll bet that my typing speed is cut in half with numerous errors popping up. I don't really lift my fingers much-- they glide across the keyboard. The dang keys on your old school desktop keyboards stick up too much for me.

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I can type much faster than I can speak with the right laptop keyboard. Shoot, sometimes my hands type faster than I can think, and I've got to go back and erase random words that muscle memory have made up while waiting on my real brain to spit something out to my fingers.

LOL,

Something similar happens with me. I'd trained myself years ago in the military to stay up very very late catching up my investigative synopsis. That conditioning, plus chronic back pain from 4 compressed vertebrae and sleep apnea have all combined to limit me to sleeping only four hours a night lest I wake up and can't straighten up or with a migraine the size of the Bismark.

That means I can dose off anywhere at anytime and that's why I consume so much coffee. Anyway, one of the places I doze off a lot is at the keyboard. If I'm composing text and typing fast when that happens, I'll often have some random thought pass through my mind as soon as I go unconscious; and, since I'm slamming away at the keyboard when it happens, I normally type a sentence or two of those thoughts before my fingers finally stop moving. Then I wake up and realize what had happened and I have to go back over the last few lines of text to find the point where I stopped typing the report and where I started typing random thoughts.

I remember when that first started happening; it was back in 1978 in Korea when I'd pull 24 hour duty investigator shift. I'd have to have all investigative reading files caught up and on the NCOIC's desk by 0700 hours or I couldn't go home and crash until they were done. One day my boss, Dan, called me in and asked me what the f**k Jerry Titus' death when he crashed his Trans Am had to do with the assault case I was working on. He tossed the file to me and I'd apparently typed two complete sentences describing his crash in his Trans Am in August 1969. Titus was my hero; one helluva driver and I used to go over to Lime Rock for no other reason but to watch that guy race. There I was, 9 year after Titus' death, unconsciously slamming out something that was archived in the back of my head which I'd just randomly accessed as I'd dozed off. Really weird; surreal even. After that, I got into the habit of carefully re-reading whatever I'd typed.

It doesn't happen so much anymore; mostly because the arthritis in my hands has slowed me down to the point where, unless I'm consciously forcing those fingers to move over the keyboard they want imitate sausages instead of function like fingers. Look out when I've taken some advil though!

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Gave up the desktop PC many years ago. Been using notebooks every since, but with "large" external flat-screen and keyboard via docking station. Can grab 'n go with the notebook from the office as necessary. Usually try to plan/budget for a new notebook every 2-3 years.

I've burned through many keyboards as well. Some on the notebook itself and some remote/desktop units. Some are just better than others in their response and stability.

Smith Corona image below was not the 'mill' I learned 'touch typing' on, but it was my first "portable" typewriter.

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I can type much faster than I can speak with the right laptop keyboard. Shoot, sometimes my hands type faster than I can think, and I've got to go back and erase random words that muscle memory have made up while waiting on my real brain to spit something out to my fingers.

LOL,

Something similar happens with me. I'd trained myself years ago in the military to stay up very very late catching up my investigative synopsis. That conditioning, plus chronic back pain from 4 compressed vertebrae and sleep apnea have all combined to limit me to sleeping only four hours a night lest I wake up and can't straighten up or with a migraine the size of the Bismark.

That means I can dose off anywhere at anytime and that's why I consume so much coffee. Anyway, one of the places I doze off a lot is at the keyboard. If I'm composing text and typing fast when that happens, I'll often have some random thought pass through my mind as soon as I go unconscious; and, since I'm slamming away at the keyboard when it happens, I normally type a sentence or two of those thoughts before my fingers finally stop moving. Then I wake up and realize what had happened and I have to go back over the last few lines of text to find the point where I stopped typing the report and where I started typing random thoughts.

I remember when that first started happening; it was back in 1978 in Korea when I'd pull 24 hour duty investigator shift. I'd have to have all investigative reading files caught up and on the NCOIC's desk by 0700 hours or I couldn't go home and crash until they were done. One day my boss, Dan, called me in and asked me what the f**k Jerry Titus' death when he crashed his Trans Am had to do with the assault case I was working on. He tossed the file to me and I'd apparently typed two complete sentences describing his crash in his Trans Am in August 1969. Titus was my hero; one helluva driver and I used to go over to Lime Rock for no other reason but to watch that guy race. There I was, 9 year after Titus' death, unconsciously slamming out something that was archived in the back of my head which I'd just randomly accessed as I'd dozed off. Really weird; surreal even. After that, I got into the habit of carefully re-reading whatever I'd typed.

It doesn't happen so much anymore; mostly because the arthritis in my hands has slowed me down to the point where, unless I'm consciously forcing those fingers to move over the keyboard they want imitate sausages instead of function like fingers. Look out when I've taken some advil though!

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

Yea, but did you think the video was funny?

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I can type much faster than I can speak with the right laptop keyboard. Shoot, sometimes my hands type faster than I can think, and I've got to go back and erase random words that muscle memory have made up while waiting on my real brain to spit something out to my fingers.

LOL,

Something similar happens with me. I'd trained myself years ago in the military to stay up very very late catching up my investigative synopsis. That conditioning, plus chronic back pain from 4 compressed vertebrae and sleep apnea have all combined to limit me to sleeping only four hours a night lest I wake up and can't straighten up or with a migraine the size of the Bismark.

That means I can dose off anywhere at anytime and that's why I consume so much coffee. Anyway, one of the places I doze off a lot is at the keyboard. If I'm composing text and typing fast when that happens, I'll often have some random thought pass through my mind as soon as I go unconscious; and, since I'm slamming away at the keyboard when it happens, I normally type a sentence or two of those thoughts before my fingers finally stop moving. Then I wake up and realize what had happened and I have to go back over the last few lines of text to find the point where I stopped typing the report and where I started typing random thoughts.

I remember when that first started happening; it was back in 1978 in Korea when I'd pull 24 hour duty investigator shift. I'd have to have all investigative reading files caught up and on the NCOIC's desk by 0700 hours or I couldn't go home and crash until they were done. One day my boss, Dan, called me in and asked me what the f**k Jerry Titus' death when he crashed his Trans Am had to do with the assault case I was working on. He tossed the file to me and I'd apparently typed two complete sentences describing his crash in his Trans Am in August 1969. Titus was my hero; one helluva driver and I used to go over to Lime Rock for no other reason but to watch that guy race. There I was, 9 year after Titus' death, unconsciously slamming out something that was archived in the back of my head which I'd just randomly accessed as I'd dozed off. Really weird; surreal even. After that, I got into the habit of carefully re-reading whatever I'd typed.

It doesn't happen so much anymore; mostly because the arthritis in my hands has slowed me down to the point where, unless I'm consciously forcing those fingers to move over the keyboard they want imitate sausages instead of function like fingers. Look out when I've taken some advil though!

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

Yea, but did you think the video was funny?

Nah, been on the inspector end of that conversation enough times that I no longer find it amusing. We're the wrong audience for that; it needs to be shown over at Active Rain and all of the real estate websites. Maybe if the big-haired ladies realized that the disdain they hold for us is mirrored by the disdain we have for them they'd learn to stop making such absurd demands of inspectors.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Included is a picture of my first computer. Approximatley the size of 2 refrigerators side by side. Made in 1978 by Digital Equipment Corporation. Supported roughly 200 users concurently. 1 mb of memory. Yes, Megabyte. I remember the day we upgraded to 1.5 mg. There was dancing in the hallways between the cubicles.

I operated and managed computer data centers for Fortune 500 companies, government, and the military for several decades. Never really saw the use of a personal computer when I had computers that filled entire rooms at my disposal.

Wife bought our first home computer around 1991. She buyes a new one about about every 3-4 years. My 14 yr son has already bought 2 laptops. The first computer I bought was a laptop about 2 years ago.

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