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How can I paint the exterior above garage safely?


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Hello Everyone,

I am trying to paint the exterior wood shingle above garage (area C in attached photo).

As the height of this area, I need to use a ladder on the roof. The roof is with a slope. It is kind of tricky and dangerous for me to work there.

I also tried to hire someone to paint it, but the area is really small and no one even give me a quotation.

Is there anyone in Calgary may help me? Or can you tell me any advise that how I can do it myself safely?

Thanks a lot.

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If "safely" means compliant with industry standards (harness, fall arrestor, etc.), it would cost more to buy the equipment than it would to find someone to paint it. If you're not comfortable on roofs and ladders, don't do something stupid like get on a roof and ladder.

Keep trying to find someone. It's the peak of the construction season, and no one's interested. Make a lot of calls, someone will bite sooner or later.

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I think that the roof area in front of the "C" gable is actually an easy 4 feet, and the slope isn't bad. There's a bit of foreshortening going on so the photo makes it look like less than it is. Given that the gable height there shouldn't be over 10 feet or so it's not that tough. BUT if you aren't used to such things -- and the OP obviously isn't -- the best solution is to get a pro to do it. Try Angieslist to find a good painter.

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I'd take a couple roof jacks left over from my roofing days, break the adhesive bond on a couple shingles, use a flat bar to pull some roofing nails out about 1/4" then hook the jacks on them. From that you can build a simple frame and throw a couple sheets plywood to get a flat surface. Be sure to apply more adhesive to the loosened shingles when you're done.

Don't disregard what Kurt said up front: if you're not comfortable with it, don't do it.

Marc

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Thanks all your points.

It seems the roof jacks are the easiest way. One concern is if the nail for the roof jacks hurt the roof. What do I need to do for the roof after using the nails there?

Plus, I will do it myself only if I can't find any local painter and I feel solid and safe to do it:)

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The jack hooks onto an existing roofing nail. That nail needs to be pulled out just 1/4" so the jack can be slid under the shingle and hooked onto the nail. When you're done, just knock the nail back down and apply new adhesive to the shingle.

Use 2 or 3 jacks.

Marc

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Make sure the painter you hire has some kind of insurance for himself, as well as liability insurance for damage to your property. In my province, they pay into WorkSafeBC. If the painter hurts himself while working for you, it can be charged to your insurance unless you get something in writing first. Do some research. Sorry for the negative attitude.

I've seen a few roofs like that where the painter's ladder has damaged the shingles.

The hydraulic lift from a rental company would be the most fun. Your driveway has a slope to it, so you will need some planks to park it on so that it is level and stable.

Another idea is to erect scaffolding from the rental place in front of the garage door. From there, lay planks across to the roof halfway up to where you want to paint. A 2 X 6 laid on the roof will protect the shingles. The scaffolding will give you confidence to get up there. Use a paint pole and a safety rope of some kind.

A variation on Marc's roof jacks - lift shingles and nail or screw long strips of metal flashing to the roof deck. Nail the lower ends of the flashing to a 2 X 4 laid across the roof. When finished, just snip the tin off or tuck it up out of sight for next time. Tie the ladder with a rope thru that window. Don't do this if your knees start shaking because then you will fall and the house still won't be painted. [:)]

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The jack hooks onto an existing roofing nail. That nail needs to be pulled out just 1/4" so the jack can be slid under the shingle and hooked onto the nail. When you're done, just knock the nail back down and apply new adhesive to the shingle.

Use 2 or 3 jacks.

Marc

Never rely on a single roofing nail to support a jack. Do your research as to how to safely install the jacks. Roofing nail heads commonly snap off.

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I'm with the bucket lift guys. A couple of hundred bucks and you're safer than any of the other suggestions, plus you can get any other high work done while you have it there.

Ask a couple of neighbors if they have any high work they need to get done and split the cost of the lift with them!

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Never rely on a single roofing nail to support a jack. Do your research as to how to safely install the jacks. Roofing nail heads commonly snap off.

I have to agree with this. I use roof jacks a lot, and never use roofing nails to set them, I use 16d sinkers. Roofing nails are often 1" or less, they're rarely into the framing at all even if they were long enough, they're often just into 7/16" OSB, they're often not that straight, and once you start backing them out they get even looser.

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Never rely on a single roofing nail to support a jack. Do your research as to how to safely install the jacks. Roofing nail heads commonly snap off.

I have to agree with this. I use roof jacks a lot, and never use roofing nails to set them, I use 16d sinkers. Roofing nails are often 1" or less, they're rarely into the framing at all even if they were long enough, they're often just into 7/16" OSB, they're often not that straight, and once you start backing them out they get even looser.

I do not disagree with the heads snapping off as I have seen it too many times. What I don't get is, why 16d nails? They rarely (never) hit anything but roof decking and then become a hazard in the attic. I have used roof jacks many times and usually with 1.25" hand "driven" (snug) roof nails, 3 per jack, 2-3 bundles of shingles and two dudes working on a 12/12 with never an incident.

On the other hand, one of those 4 wheel drive all terrain bucket lifts are a lot more fun than roof jacks[;)]

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I'm generally building the house or addition, and framing the roof. If it's steep enough for toe boards, we start setting jacks right at the bottom after the first row of sheathing goes on, and the nails go into the rafters or trusses. If I'm setting up on an existing roof, I find the rafters with some scientific tapping of the hammer, and then nail jacks to framing. I'm not a regular roofer by any stretch, just a risk-averse lifetime tradesman who often works at heights. Maybe if I roofed every day I'd get sloppy and just nail jacks to the sheathing.

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Set up a rope belay inside of that room and out the window to you so if you fell you wouldn't go far then use a ladder with some kind of rubber feet on it, like a Little Giant. I've got I-bolts stuck up under the eaves around my house for just such occasions. Stick one in the top of that gable as soon as you get up there to improve your belay. Couple wraps around your waist with seat belt width webbing and figure 8 knot to that.

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Set up a rope belay inside of that room and out the window to you so if you fell you wouldn't go far then use a ladder with some kind of rubber feet on it, like a Little Giant. I've got I-bolts stuck up under the eaves around my house for just such occasions. Stick one in the top of that gable as soon as you get up there to improve your belay. Couple wraps around your waist with seat belt width webbing and figure 8 knot to that.

Denny says he'll do it. [:)]

I agree, a rope around the waist gives me Spiderman qualities. But Spiderman wouldn't have posted here asking for advice, so we'll go with the rented bucket lift. I like the idea of inviting neighbors over, too.

Be careful driving that machine around. This painter was using one to paint a condo building the other day. Broke the curb wall. I can't wait to see his repair.

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The sack of concrete and the trowel are laid out there to keep the tenants from screaming at him. That's pretty sharp.

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Jeez,

Just use a Little Giant or LG clone. drop one side so that the inside legs will be parallel to the face of the wall, open up that window and tie off the ladder to the window frame. Get a handle extension for a roller and paint the danged wall.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Jeez,

Just use a Little Giant or LG clone. drop one side so that the inside legs will be parallel to the face of the wall, open up that window and tie off the ladder to the window frame. Get a handle extension for a roller and paint the danged wall.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

Paint shingles with a roller?

Marc

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Are they shingles?

Hell, I never bothered to enlarge the photo. If that's what they are, I agree that a roller wouldn't be appropriate. If they are shingles he shouldn't be painting them anyway. They need to be stained or dyed. Paint will just trap moisture in them and cause them to curl and cup.

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