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receptacle box setback


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I'm sure many of you find cases where drywall is installed over drywall resulting in the boxes being set back from the edge. I usually find loose receptacles and excessive gaps as a result. Obviously I call for repairs in these cases.

In another case, I found the drywall was very carefully cut tight to the box opening such that there are no resulting gaps once the cover is installed. In addition, the mounting tabs on the receptacle overhang the drywall panel enough to tighten them pretty good. In a case like this, should I still call for repairs such as box extenders or whatnot?

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It's a shame how easy it would have been to install box extenders before hanging the extra wall panels. Now they're gonna have a PITA to deal with. Always amazes me. If we keep writing them up, maybe some of them will start to get it. Ya think?

Hey John, nothing we say in boring inspection reports has much effect on anybody, I'm afraid.

Why not cash in on it and invent a better box extender, like one that costs a buck and can be installed with crazy glue? [:)]

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I do. The box must be within 1/4 inch of the finished wall surface (314.20) to contain sparks. Drywall has paper on both sides, it's combustible.

Marc

Drywall is considered a noncombustible material. Firewalls are made of drywall. Not much point of something designed to contain fire if it were combustible.

In a combustible finish the box must be flush or proud of the surface.

Any gaps larger than 1/8" need to be repaired based on the NEC.

Box extenders like BE-1 from Arlington can be easily installed .

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You don't seem to be aware of what a mud ring is, what it does, and why it makes the issue go away.

I have no illusion that folks will one day do things differently. When given total freedom to do whatever they want, most folks imitate each other.

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Well, of course, but explain how the hole is a problem with a mud ring. The result here is a perfect opening every time.

I've come to love pipe and steel boxes. Maybe it's just me, but I don't know as to how I could do a rope job.

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It comes down to the skill or lack of skill on the drywallers. Even a good drywallers can't make up for a box that is too deep or a too shallow ring. A 1/2" ring in 1/2" drywall is not thick enough to be flush. If the installer goes crazy with the Rotozip, all bets are off. If someone add a layer of tile over the drywall it gets even worse.

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Our guys get it right. Shoot, they use the ring as the screed for the mud. Nice flush mounts with a big fat steel box that will hold anything forever.

Nothing's right if the workmen can't get it right. That's true for any and every thing.

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Absolutely. Lumber quality is ridiculously bad.

The housing industry is in crisis mode AFAIC. It's trying to bend new mfg. and engineered products into the mold of Early American Traditional sorts of designs.

We got the engineering and stuff to make remarkably efficient and appropriate designs, but people want the look more than they want the function.

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Premium hem fir studs vary in width 7/8", sometimes on the same board. Thickness is off a similar percentage. OSB has curled so badly the sheets will stand on end. Hanger nails don't fit through the holes in the hangers, clips don't fit in the nail guns. Even the LVLs are inconsistent, in width and thickness. It's worse than I've ever seen it.

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Premium hem fir studs vary in width 7/8", sometimes on the same board. Thickness is off a similar percentage. OSB has curled so badly the sheets will stand on end. Hanger nails don't fit through the holes in the hangers, clips don't fit in the nail guns. Even the LVLs are inconsistent, in width and thickness. It's worse than I've ever seen it.

???????????

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Yes. The materials are that bad. Not from the big boxes either. Sadly, the few pieces that came from HD were a magnitude of order better.

We always jump to the conclusion that the trades didn't care or that it was DIY and they didn't know. There is also the very real possibility that they were supplied with garbage materials.

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I have bought, used, or seen many of those materials in recent years and have never seen anything close to what you are describing. Dimensional lumber has relatively close tolerances to meet standards.

Whether the lumber warps as it dries is another story.

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