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Wood columns on a home built in 2007


Scottpat
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I have never found wood columns on a home built in the past 25 years, and this was just built. It surprised the heck out of me. $450,000 home and they used 6x6 treated wood post on concrete pads . Foundation wall was CMU.

Anyone see anything wrong with this? I know about the flex-round.

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Originally posted by Bain

I see it every once in a while. It's cheap and lazy, but legal. I never know exactly what to say about it, since it doesn't break any rules.

Ha! I've seen tens of thousands of wood columns under homes. They're just fine.

The only place I see cheap-ass CMUs is under manufactured homes.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Hi,

You know, Jim. Come to think of it, I have seen CMU columns - in the same place you have under manufactured homes.

It's kind of comical seeing someone refer to wood posts as cheap ass and lazy when I routinely inspect 100 year old bungalows with the original posts still in place and doing fine. Hell, and those aren't even pressure-treated. Oh well, I guess it's a regional thing.

OT - OF!!!

M.

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That's exactly it, Mike. A regional thing. Steel piers or CMUs with slushed cells are the norm in my area. On the infrequent occasions that I find wooden piers in a new house, the synapses sort of tingle 'cause they're not what I'm used to.

Hmmm, not to get metaphysical, but I suppose that makes me guilty of pier racism, doesn't it?

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It does now...

Originally posted by Nolan Kienitz

Gary,

Does that mean the stopper is not working?

Back to the topic... id="blue">

A real feature of this BB is that we hear from persons all over the continent (and beyond). Regional issues can be a real source of entertainment and education.

Chad and I live just 80 miles or so from each other, but he sees mostly concrete block foundations in newer construction while I see almost 100% poured in place concrete (Union power?).

There is an electrician around here who likes to chain 2 or 3 GFCI outlets on a single circuit. I asked about testing such chains once, and fellow HIs were puzzled - why would you do that? I still can't find a good reason, but we see what we see. I like hearing about the stuff you all find, but I have yet to run into. Thanks!

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Originally posted by ozofprev

It does now...

Originally posted by Nolan Kienitz

Gary,

Does that mean the stopper is not working?

Back to the topic... id="blue">

A real feature of this BB is that we hear from persons all over the continent (and beyond). Regional issues can be a real source of entertainment and education.

Chad and I live just 80 miles or so from each other, but he sees mostly concrete block foundations in newer construction while I see almost 100% poured in place concrete (Union power?).

Where I grew up in Dutchess County, NY, about 100 miles north from Noo Yawk, block foundations are rare. We poured ours. Until two years ago, my 80+ year old Dad was still putting in placed concrete foundations and digging the footings by hand and setting up most of those forms on his own (stubborn, stuborn, stubborn).

Most of them out this way (Puget Sound) are placed concrete as well. It's pretty rare that I run into CMU foundations except for in trailer parks.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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