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New to inspection industry....few questions


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Hello,

I'm new to the industry (finished training in july). Im in the process of putting together my own business and have a few questions.

1. What type's of insurance besides liability should I look into? How much liability insurance?

2. I am looking at buying an all in one starter tool kit. http://www.professionalequipment.com/ba ... cessories/ what are your opinions on this kit? Any other recomends?

3. What else not included in this kit should I purchase.

I have an idea on what tools, but I dont want to go to my first second paid inspection and overlooked purchasing a tool.

Any help and advice on marketing, or anything for that matter, beside whats been poste (read it all) that anybody could offer would be appreciated.

Thank You,

Kyle Collins

Safe Home Inspections

P.S. excuse my sloppy grammar and typing......my 11 month old daughter is crying..

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Originally posted by safe_home_inspections

1. What type's of insurance besides liability should I look into? How much liability insurance?

Errors & omissions. I don't know if your state requires it, but I wouldn't do a single inspection without it.

2. I am looking at buying an all in one starter tool kit. http://www.professionalequipment.com/ba ... cessories/ what are your opinions on this kit? Any other recomends?
Go to the start page of The Inspectors Journal and click on the yellow square on the right side that says "Stop overpaying for tools". HI Essentials has the absolute best prices.
3. What else not included in this kit should I purchase.

  • A real flashlight (if you get a Streamlight Ultra-stinger, you'll need 2 to get through 1 inspection.)
  • An assortment of ladders that can get you into and onto everything.
  • A tool box that's strong enough to stand on.
  • Coveralls, kneepads & a respirator.
  • A cordless screwdriver and a really long screwdriver for probing and prying.
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If you have a young child I want to guess you are on a budget so see if you can get what you need seperatly.

You may not need a keychain laser or home inspection book I hope.

If you are just getting the kit for the sake of not knowing what to get we have a problem Houston.Do some more dry runs and figure out what you really need.

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Originally posted by safe_home_inspections

. . . 1. What type's of insurance besides liability should I look into? How much liability insurance?

Get E&O insurance.

2. I am looking at buying an all in one starter tool kit. http://www.professionalequipment.com/ba ... cessories/ what are your opinions on this kit? Any other recomends?

3. What else not included in this kit should I purchase.

The first thing you'll need is a good flashlight. There isn't one in that kit. Get a rechargeable Mag or Streamlight. You want lots of light.

The second thing you'll want is a screwdriver. There’s no screwdriver in that kit. Get one of those six-in-one jobs.

I have an idea on what tools, but I dont want to go to my first second paid inspection and overlooked purchasing a tool.

I don't know what that means. A friendly observation: if you write something like the paragraph above in an inspection report, you're going to get in trouble.

Any help and advice on marketing, or anything for that matter, beside whats been poste (read it all) that anybody could offer would be appreciated.

Thank You,

Kyle Collins

Safe Home Inspections

P.S. excuse my sloppy grammar and typing......my 11 month old daughter is crying..

I understand the 11-month old thing. (I've got three kids myself, including a pair of twins.) But you've got to develop the knack of being able to write clearly despite distractions. If you write your reports onsite, you'll have people jabbering all around you. If you take the reports home to write, you'll have baby noises to contend with. Which brings me to my final tool recommendation: earplugs. I use small, discreet ones.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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I understand the 11-month old thing. (I've got three kids myself, including a pair of twins.) But you've got to develop the knack of being able to write clearly despite distractions. If you write your reports onsite, you'll have people jabbering all around you. If you take the reports home to write, you'll have baby noises to contend with. Which brings me to my final tool recommendation: earplugs. I use small, discreet ones.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

Thread drift...

Jim,

I also have three children. A four year old girl and 21 month old twins (boy and girl).

Full time Dad, full time Husband, Full time business owner.....I know you can relate.

-Kevin

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Also;

Back-up camera

Back-up Flashlight

Back-up Screwdrivers (cordless or whatever)

A good telescopic magnet

Extra batteries

As of now I do not own a Little Giant Ladder or similar, due to the fact I already own a lot of ladders. However, I am considering buying one. I wonder how many other inspectors use these types of ladders? & Are they worth the investment?

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Little Giants are wonderful; I have two.

I also have a telescoping ladder that I hate, but I use it every day. It's just so darn handy & lightweight, I am seduced into using it for everything I can, even though it's flimsy and makes me nervous. If I was smart, I'd pitch it in the rubbish, and only use the LG.

Backup tools are smart. I keep 3 1,000,000cp spotlights charging in the car @ all times. Sometimes I give one to the customer; they really dig it.

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Since you're just starting, save yourself about $400, skip the Little Giants and get two Gorilla Ladders from the orange box store.

A 13' and a 21' together cost less than the price of one 13' LG and they're rated for 300 lbs - more than the LG. Yeah, they're heavier and not as slick and polished as the LG, but they work fine and for a savings of about $400 on startup you can take that extra cash and apply it to the purchase of a Protimeter SM.

In a couple of years, when the balance sheet at the end of the month starts showing a little blue instead of all that red at the end of the month, you can purchase one or two LG's and use the Gorilla's around the house or save them for when you hire and need to equip your first employee inspector.

That had been my plan when I purchased these two Gorilla ladders. I'm still using them 5 years later and see no need to buy the LGs. I figure that I'm getting a little bit more of a workout by hefting the Gorilla's around and that's probably good for my chubby butt.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Thanks everybody for the in put. I know about the flashlights, respirators, ladders, etc., I was more concerned about more technical equipment. LOL. No I don't need a book, I passed with a 96% in my class. As far as my grammar in my original posting, I'm not to concerned about my reports. I have a degree in writing and literature. I think I can handle using proper grammar in my reports. Especially considering I previously owned a roofing company.........Thanks again for the input guys.

Kyle

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Originally posted by Kevin A. Richardson

Thread drift...

Jim,

I also have three children. A four year old girl and 21 month old twins (boy and girl).

Full time Dad, full time Husband, Full time business owner.....I know you can relate.

-Kevin

Oh, yeah! You're kids are spread out the same as mine. My daughter is 3 years older than the twins.

The twin thing gets way easier around the time they turn two. In fact, I'd say that they become easier than singletons since the twins keep each other company.

It's a great time in your life too. It goes by fast, enjoy it.

It seems like my daughter was 4 years old just last week, but for some reason she'll be going off to college this September.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Originally posted by hausdok

Bill,

I haven't a clue. Is the thingy that Les mentioned what you're talking about? How do you use it for an inspection. My curmudgeon mind wants to know.

2842_bulb_syringe.jpg

For testing diaphragm switch activated sump pumps.

diaphragm-switch.jpg

Do you guys still use your mouth to suck on the tube in the cord to check them?

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Originally posted by safe_home_inspections

No I don't need a book, I passed with a 96% in my class. As far as my grammar in my original posting, I'm not to concerned about my reports. I have a degree in writing and literature. I think I can handle using proper grammar in my reports. Especially considering I previously owned a roofing company.........Thanks again for the input guys.

Kyle

Well my friend, for a person who has a degree in Writing and Literature, you should be the one to understand the importance of books. A home inspector can never have enough books, pamphlets and various other types of literature on the bookshelf.

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Originally posted by safe_home_inspections

No I don't need a book, I passed with a 96% in my class. As far as my grammar in my original posting, I'm not to concerned about my reports. I have a degree in writing and literature. I think I can handle using proper grammar in my reports. Especially considering I previously owned a roofing company.........Thanks again for the input guys.

Kyle

I cringed a bit when I read this. The high score in the home inspector class is great - for a start. It doesn't mean you know inspections; it doesn't mean you can consistently provide quality service. It is really important to follow another inspector on a bunch of jobs. Then start inspecting your house, your friends' houses, etc. You'll find your own answers for the tool question. You'll also walk away from each job with a list of topics you need you research and learn more about.

Keep reading here. I owe a lot to a couple seasoned guys in my area and the gentlemen I've never met here on this forum.

Good luck with the new business and new baby. Mine are fairly new as well.

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Les, I don't know when the last time you were in Austin was, but it's not what it was. Though there are some hold-out blocks, much of the beautiful old neighborhood has been abused beyond recognition. It's easily among the most dangerous areas of the city. I occasionally have a job in Austin. I love the architecture and history, but I keep a close eye on my car if my tools are in it.

Oak Park, where I get most of my work, is generally very well-kept. Tons of diversity. A big variety of people, rich and poor, black and white, snobs and good easy-going folks.

To return from my tangent, though... No, people don't wash and polish the homes anymore. Either hire out to paint it, or hire out to power wash it.

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Last time I was shot, I was in Austin @ Central and Washington. First floor of Sienna Girls' School. That neighborhood should have been required viewing for all home inspectors. Within several blocks you could have inspected every type of house ever built; from Lustrons to Frank Lloyd Wright. The brickwork is beyond belief.

Sorry to hear the neighborhood has deferred maintenance.

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