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Replace 19 year old Velux FS and VS Skylights


bourbondog
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I need to put on a new roof - original 1991. One roofer suggested I should replace the skylights, the other did not. They are Velux FS 606 and VS 606. The VS is leaking slightly, but the flashing around it looks soft. The wood finish is flaking on both.

I am leaning toward putting new skylights in to save a problem down the road. But I don't want to open myself up to more problems either.

Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

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I've installed dozens or hundreds of Velux lights. I have a half dozen on my current home that are all >18 years old.

They don't leak. They're in fine condition. Velux has had the (almost) same flashing package for the last 30 years. If you install them properly, which is not hard, they do not leak.

If yours are weathered and the flashing is "soft", something else is wrong. I suspect they weren't installed right. You should probably replace them, because Velux flashing packages don't get "soft".

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I've had the same experience as Kurt. If they're installed with the correct Velux kit, on the proper slope, you can't make 'em leak.

Same here. I installed four Velux skylights in the roof of an addition I built on my home. I used their flashing kit and did everything according to the instructions. No leaks in over 12 years.

bourbondog - you'll need to look at them closely and see if the wood is in good shape, with no rot. If the wood is good you can refinish them. Also check the weather seal on the ventilating units. Price out some new units (they are not cheap) and decide if you want to replace with new or spend the time & money to rehab the old. Whatever you do, spend the money on the Velux flashing kit (it's not cheap) and make sure that whoever does the work follows the manufacturer's instructions.

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Not true. E glass and argon filled panes. Snow doesn't melt off my skylites; I have to brush it off. Good skylites last as long as most roofing materials they're installed on. When the roof goes, change out the panes.

The idea that skylites leak and/or are net energy losers is not true.

If one just plain doesn't like them because they think they're ugly, well, OK.

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Velux is the only brand I'll install. I use their flashing kits and cover the roof above and below with GAF's Liberty base sheet. That being said, I'm changing out a Velux unit in a roofing job in a week or so. The pane seals have failed and the bay is all stained and pulpy from the condensate run-off.

The roofing job would be 2000 less if the original owner didn't install a skylight.

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I agree that replacing them is the best option because you can save a lot of hassle if your roof leaks in the skylight area after replacement. The roofer can't blame the problem on the old skylights. Another bonus is that you also get a new warranty on the skylights. You should also look at some of the cool options available on the new skylights (i.e. window treatments).

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Thank you for all of your answers. I am going to put in new skylights. I too believe the old ones were not put in correctly, but I still did pretty good for those 19 years. The roofer is going to wrap the frame with ice shield and use new Velux EDL Flashing kits.

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  • 2 years later...

Hello all,

I have some early 1980s Velux FS6 fixed skylights that are starting to leak at the lower corners where the glass meet the inside wood trim. There is also condensation between the glass panes. Velux does not offer replacement glass. I am wondering if it makes sense to try to have a glass person make replacement glass units. My only concern in doing that is making sure the seal is correct when putting the new glass in place. Has anyone done this? I am trying to get away from having to rip out the old units and install completely new skylights. Any advice would be appreciated.

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The idea that skylites leak and/or are net energy losers is not true.

How could a skylight NOT be a net energy loser? You take your well-insulated roof, let's say U-.026, and you put a couple of big holes in it--I haven't looked at Velux NFRC ratings in a while, but let's say you really ring the bell and get a unit U-factor of U-.25. An area-weighted U-factor calc will show significant decrease in the overall U-factor unless the roof is huge and the skylights are tiny.

Snow on top as an insulator is a bonus, and I agree they don't leak, although I have observed plenty with broken seals and that's when the owner always wants something done.

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How could a skylight NOT be a net energy loser? You take your well-insulated roof, let's say U-.026, and you put a couple of big holes in it--I haven't looked at Velux NFRC ratings in a while, but let's say you really ring the bell and get a unit U-factor of U-.25. An area-weighted U-factor calc will show significant decrease in the overall U-factor unless the roof is huge and the skylights are tiny.

Snow on top as an insulator is a bonus, and I agree they don't leak, although I have observed plenty with broken seals and that's when the owner always wants something done.

I'll back off the "net energy loser" part (on this 2 year old thread); of course they have to be a net energy loser. It's a window.

I was gushing ecstatic, as my Velux are the most efficient windows in my entire (94 year old) home.

They're actually better than the front half of my bungalow roof; I've still got one BR with 1" balsam wool batts between the rafters. I'm going to tear it all out next spring and foam it up.

OTOH, snow sits on my skylites for days and days; it only melts off with direct sun. If you touch the inner pane on a sub-zero night, the glass feels warm.

My own take on roofing and skylites is.......Given what I've seen of Velux, the lifespan of a lite falls somewhere about halfway through the life of the 2nd roof, meaning they easily last as long as one roof covering lasts, but not quite as long as two roof coverings, i.e., it's nuts to change out a roof and not change out the skylite.

Yes, it's more money, but why would anyone not take advantage of the logistics of roof replacement as the perfect opportunity to update the skylites?

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Is ice damming a major issue with skylights in snow country? The heat flow thru the skylight melts it, the roof surface below it refreezes it.

Marc

My experience is that doesn't happen with the glass, but at the corners of the RO when underlayment and insulation details are less than ideal. Conditioned air makes it to the underside of the flashing causing condensation on the interior and enough melt water to contribute to damming.

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  • 2 years later...

I have Velux skylights FS62 3075 N05A according to the interior sash plate. Here in Colorado we have has several days of rain and one of the two skylights has developed a leak in the upper left corner.

1. Can I fix this myself?

2. I'm hypothesizing a rubber seal may have gone bad and needs to be replaced.

3. Should I contact Velux?

Thanks for the feed back

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