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Interesting word origin


Marc
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This came in by Email. I don't know if there's any truth to it but it certainly fits.....

Manure: In the 16th and 17th centuries, everything had to be transported by ship and it was also before commercial fertilizer's invention, so large shipments of manure were common.

It was shipped dry, because in dry form it weighed a lot less than when wet, but once water (at sea) hit it, it not only became heavier, but the process of fermentation began again, of which a by-product is methane gas. As the stuff was stored below decks in bundles you can see what could (and did) happen. Methane began to build up below decks and the first time someone came below at night with a lantern, BOOOOM!

Several ships were destroyed in this manner before it was determined just what was happening. After that, the bundles of manure were always stamped with the term 'Ship High In Transit' on them, which meant for the sailors to stow it high enough off the lower decks so that any water that came into the hold would not touch this volatile cargo and start the production of methane. Thus evolved the term ' S.H.I.T ' , (Ship High In Transport) which has come down through the centuries and is in use to this very day.You probably did not know the true history of this word.

Neither did I.

I had always thought it was a golf term.

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Crikey! That takes me back to my jolly old Limey roots. "Codswallop" actually used to be part of my everyday vocabulary. And no, it isn't from the Monty Python fish slapping sketch.

From one of Richards inspection reports:

"The electrics are all sixes and sevens , why even the power points are wrong way round".

"The AGA cooker is total pants - all of the hobs are a bit dodgy ".

When I was in the UK, I occasionally heard "shite" in conversation. It was usually used when one was being polite but still wanted to say shit.

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While we're on the whole subject of schite, and it shouldn't be easily construed as drift, I'm reminded of my all time worst home inspection.

It was a few years ago (before the economy took the dive) and the home seller was being foreclosed upon. For apparently the last 30 days or so, before she was put out on the street, she exacted her warped payback against the bank for her inability to pay her mortgage. Wherever she was, at the moment she changed her child's diaper, she merely dropped it unfolded on the floor and let the cards fall where they may. It was lovely - my lucky day. And, being the trooper that I am, I did my job skillfully navigating that mine field, as the buyer, listing and selling agents all stood out in the street.

It was such a bad experience, that I had completely forgotten about it until now.

And, Marc, if you stick to this long enough, you too can have a 1 in 10,000 experience like that, at which time you can choose from any or even all of the above expressions. Now there's a purple heart of sorts to look forward to isn't it?

There's never a dull moment in this profession and there simply isn't any version of the word being discussed that can possibly cast a better light on that experience.

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Yeah,

The shortest inspection I ever did was where a senile old fellow's kids came home after 20 plus years, found him living like an animal, got a court-ordered commitment to a home and then put his house up for sale.

I arrived, did my deal with the pre-inspection contract, headed inside and said to the clients, "Are you coming?" Curiously, nobody wanted to go in, so I walked inside and discovered why; every square inch of every horizontal surface was covered with excreta and soiled and wadded up toilet tissue.

I walked from the front entry through the house to the back, glancing in rooms as I went. The sink and toilet in the bathroom were filled to the brim with harded shit and there was about six inches in the bathtub. In the kitchen, the kitchen sink was filled to the brim. There was rat shit everywhere. The place stank with rat urine just as much as it did with human shit.

I walked back out and said, "I'm outta here; I'm not going to spend a couple of hours inspecting that place." The agent, or maybe it was the client, I don't remember which, asked, "How can we convince you to finish the job." I thought about it for a second and answered, "You can get me a full bio suit with self-contained breathing apparatus so I don't have to breath the air in there or touch anything. You're going to be paying for it and my normal fee will be doubled." Someone said, "That's outrageous," and I shrugged and left, mumbling something about it might be outrageous but I didn't intend to catch ringworm or worse from that house.

The whole thing took 5 minutes; less than two of them in the house I think.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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And, here's where that hypersensitivity comes into play maybe, Mark.

Bill said it was a load of crap based upon his own personal expereience in Europe - apparently several visits? But, what he didn't say, was it's "YOUR" load of crap - and it isn't. It's someone else's load of crap that got teed up and passed around.

Make sense?

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Now that's drift, Jerry.. Where's a moderator when ya need one. We're talkin' schite here... [:-censore [:-propell

I've been patiently waiting for someone to explain the origin of shart.

I figured for sure that would be next. Or, does that happen first?

And, here's where that hypersensitivity comes into play maybe, Mark.

Bill said it was a load of crap based upon his own personal expereience in Europe - apparently several visits? But, what he didn't say, was it's "YOUR" load of crap - and it isn't. It's someone else's load of crap that got teed up and passed around.

Make sense?

Europe?

I thought it just a punny play on words. As in, Boatload of crap.

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Bill said it was a load of crap based upon his own personal experience in Europe - apparently several visits?

"Load of crap" was an attempt at humor, in response to a made-up story about "shipments of manure". I haven't visited Europe to any extent, just my time in the UK. I have 3 books on word and phrase origins. I became interested in it after hearing a lot of made-up crap from guides at historic buildings.
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That story is a load of bunk. "Bunk" is a sailing term, isn't it?

No way the pilgrims had money to pay out for organic fertilizer.

They did have tea shipped from England by the bail, and it was shitty tea, so they threw it off the dock in Boston one day, which started the tradition of dumping shit in the ocean.

Shit elimination workers, or "sewers" as they were called, wheeled barrows of night soil down to the docks to be dumped into the "chuck". There is more to this story, but you'all get my "drift", eh? [:)]

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