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opinion on roof estimate please


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I had an estimate done on my 1 story ranch with hip roof. Is the estimate reasonable in your opinion?

Tear off existing materials, Install Tamko Heritage 30yr 23 sq including waste on the main roof (4:12), 2 ply self adhereing flat roof system on 5 sq low slope. 15# felt, Ice shield at eaves and in valleys, drip edge and other flashings, remove trash

$8800

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That would be about right in my area.

For 23 sq on a 4:12 roof, why not hire a helper and do it yourself?

Point taken. But I've learned that is best to keep spending time getting paid to do what I do and pay others to do what they do.

Can you get paid $8,800 for a weekend's work?

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I'd still have to buy materials. And there's now way I'd get it done in only a weekend. I actually thought about doing it in sections. But nah, let the pros come in with their experienced crew and knock it out. Probably replacing all the decking too. The 3/8" ply from the early '60's has seen better days.

I was quoted $50 per sheet if certain pieces of ply need replacing, or, $2800 to replace all ply with 7/16" osb.

Gonna have them do all new 6" seamless gutter too. Roughly 180' total. $1600

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That works out to about $400 per square. It's in the neighborhood of what I'd charge for roof with that quality shingle. For top of the line GAF or Certainteed, it'd be another $75 a square

With a helper, I'd net $1,100-1,200 per day.

In my area, those prices are competitive for higher-end work and materials.

On the other side, a roofer is installing shingles at a new, big complex, in the snow, for $35 a square.

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What I'm undecided on is the decking. Do I pull the trigger and have existing 3/8" ply replaced with 7/16" osb for $2800 or go with $50 per sheet and only replace what needs it?

The current decking looks discolored from a ventilation problem earlier in the life of the home. But I'd guess 75% of it is probably still worthy from a structural standpoint.

What are the pros and cons of either decision in your opinion?

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I used to write a lot of housing rehab work and inspect its progress, which included a lot of roofs.

What I observed then was that 3/8 decking with a lot of age rarely survived the tear-off. It would usually delaminate and separate with every lift of the shingle shovel.

I doubt your 3/8 will survive this job.

What I'm undecided on is the decking. Do I pull the trigger and have existing 3/8" ply replaced with 7/16" osb for $2800 or go with $50 per sheet and only replace what needs it?

The current decking looks discolored from a ventilation problem earlier in the life of the home. But I'd guess 75% of it is probably still worthy from a structural standpoint.

What are the pros and cons of either decision in your opinion?

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Originally posted by Jim Baird

I used to write a lot of housing rehab work and inspect its progress, which included a lot of roofs.

What I observed then was that 3/8 decking with a lot of age rarely survived the tear-off. It would usually delaminate and separate with every lift of the shingle shovel.

I doubt your 3/8 will survive this job.

Good point. Surely the stuff has been weakened but humidity in the attic. Laminate glue failing and whatnot.

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You probably know this but it is worth mentioning. You don't buy a 30 year shingle, you buy a 30 year roofing system. Read the specifications carefully and most will tell you if you don't follow the specs you can void the warranty. Ask the roofer to include wording in the estimate that states the roof will be installed in accordance with manufacturer's published specifications.

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Your home and mine sound similar, I paid just over 8K two years ago for pretty much the same new roof. My roofer wanted $100 per sheet to replace any damaged 1/2 plywood, I bought 20 sheets in advance and had the sheets here, paid him $20 per sheet for the labor to remove and install, used 18 of the sheets. Bought the crew pizza for lunch, stayed up on the roof with them, no problems.

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That works out to about $400 per square. It's in the neighborhood of what I'd charge for roof with that quality shingle. For top of the line GAF or Certainteed, it'd be another $75 a square

With a helper, I'd net $1,100-1,200 per day.

In my area, those prices are competitive for higher-end work and materials.

On the other side, a roofer is installing shingles at a new, big complex, in the snow, for $35 a square.

About the same for me. The beauty of that is at those nets I can afford a day of recovery for every day on the roof.

One of the wholesalers near me has contact info for a crew that will strip, IWS and felt, remove debris. Then you can do the easy part.

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How about throwing 3/8" sheathing over the existing stuff after tear-off? It would save time and money.

That's worse than replacing the 3/8th with 1/2 (rafters at 16 OC) or 5/8 T&G (rafters at 24 OC). The return isn't worth the effort and cost. That 3/8 will come off much easier than most guys think. Most of the work is pulling the nails after the panels are off. With a pitch that low, it would be quick. Don't let a roofer do it, get a framing team.

Marc

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My only grievance with new sheathing is that you are tearing off good old 1960's plywood and installing OSB, which soaks up water like a sponge.

See if old-fashioned veneer plywood is available. I am finding here that it can be purchased for about the same price or a couple bucks a sheet more. Why, because the builders will just throw on OSB. Plywood prices had to come down. I just built an addition using Douglas fir 2X6's instead of SPF framing, with fir plywood sheathing on walls and roof. The difference in price was minimal, maybe $100 total. The roof sheathing got rained on one day, but dried out completely, where OSB would have held that water in.

I worked hard to get 300 sq ft done in a 6 hr day. I could have worked faster with a nail gun, and was faster when I was in my 20's.

If you are sure it is 3/8, then yes, it would be better to replace, but 7/16 OSB is a weak substitue, IMO.

Tearing off is hard work, and bin rental and disposal costs a bunch. Best to have a crew up there. They will get it done and keep your house dry.

I have 1983 plywood on my roof, trusses on 2 foot centers, and see no need to replace any of it. But if there are leaks, then that plywood would be compromised.

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Second estimate from a reputable roofer in the area is GAF LIFETIME. Timberline.

In addition to the GAF system, in this proposal they would also install ice shield to cover the entire lower slope porch roof before running the lifetime shingles all the way down over the low slope for uniform appearance and full warranty coverage on the whole roof.

$8500

They want $45 per sheet of any decking that needs replacing and would replace with 1/2" CDX, or $3000 for all new OSB.

I think 50% of my decking will survive tear off and be worthy. I think I'm gonna go with this estimate. At tear off, we'll decide if per sheet or entire decking replacement is the route. The roofer says he can respond quickly to either decision.

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I just re-roofed my old house before selling it. I had about $3350 in the job. Certainteed Landmark shingles, new felt, black metal drip edge, ice and water in the valleys, new black aluminum flashing around the chimney, about 4 sheet of plywood, and 17-18 squares. Material was about $2000, labor was $1200 cash for a few guy who knew what they were doing (just needed a translator). Permit was about $100. Wood siding repair after new flashing at the chimney was about $50.

There's a lot of mark up in roofing around here. The same job turn key from a local roofing company was more than double the price. The down side is no install warranty, the risk of someone getting hurt etc. Give a call to your local supply store and price the material before you decide.

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  • 3 weeks later...

At the valleys, why are the first two courses woven while the rest is closed cut?

Some of the roofers in this area do it this way. I see it from time to time while doing inspections. I've never seen an issue with it and it's usually present on otherwise good quality work. I had a call with the roofer about other things and asked him about the valley installation method they use. He said they weave the bottom courses to help prevent ice dams from causing problems.

Do you see any concerns with it? I'm sure somebody on this forum might know more about it than me and chime in.

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