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lifted bunched shingles


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These shingles appear to be lifting due to being crowded or packed too tightly at the ends. Is this possible? What happened here? Sure looks like more than typical nail pops.

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Lots of spacing and flashing issues too.

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A lack of proper fastening can cause this. Many times when you see long lines of vertical or horizontal cracking, it is the result of excessive expansion and contraction permitted by either high nailing (which often doesn't catch the top edge of the lowest row of shingles), or not nailing according to the manufacturer's nailing pattern (typically using less fasteners). High nailing can be particularly devastating.

When I was working with home owner's insurance claims departments, I often saw shingles that were prematurely destroyed by the excessive expansion and contraction resulting from improper or inadequate fastening.

If you return to the property, I'll bet you can lift shingles to find no nail heads in locations that there should have been nails.

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A lack of proper fastening can cause this. Many times when you see long lines of vertical or horizontal cracking, it is the result of excessive expansion and contraction permitted by either high nailing

I havent seen that in a long time, but wasn't it also a result of defective shingles?
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Photos of nailing defects from a recent inspection

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Nailing defects allow the shingles to slip and create the "bunched up" appearance.

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Nailing defect will also cause a laminated shingle to come apart.

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I have seen this exact question and answer on multiple roofing company sites:

"Q:

Why are there sections of my roof where the roof shingles are buckling or puckering?

A:

Fishmouthing looks like buckling but it is usually random on the roof. The front edge of the roof shingles are raised, and tapers back into the shingle. Although it does not usually affect the durability of the shingle, it should be addressed. Possible Causes:

Moisture build-up in the attic can cause wetting & drying cycles in the roof shingles. Improving attic ventilation can prevent this.

Installing wet shingles on a dry day, or dry shingles on a wet day will almost guarantee the appearance of fishmouthing.

Nails that are ?popping? out can also cause fishmouthing. Simply correct the position of the nail.

This phenomena is mainly an aesthetic issue that can be repaired in most cases. The most common repair method would be to use hot melt adhesive to glue down the distorted shingle rendering it flat. To proceed, the sealant bond of the affected shingle should be broken first. These types of repairs are best carried out in mild (not too hot) weather conditions."

Nobody mentions that during a storm the raised edges of the shingles increase the chance of wind blowing off individual or whole sections of the roof. I also disagree that it is only aesthetic.

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Hi,

It might simply be an alignment problem. I was sitting in my vehicle one day in a new development waiting for the client to arrive for a new home inspection. Across the street a crew of roofers was drying in the roof deck of a 2800 sf house. As I watched, it took them about 15 minutes to move from the eaves to halfway to the ridge. They were using power nailers and shooting four nails per shingle faster than I can say the words pow, pow, pow, pow. Every once in a while I'd see a shingle go down slightly misnailed at the far end. It's bottom corner would be forced against the edge of the previous shingle and would create a little fishmouth. The guy shooting the gun would see it but wouldn't do anything about it, he just started his next start corner about a quarter inch higher than the edge of the shingle he'd just nailed and got things back into alignment. Later on that afternoon, after the sun had heated those shingles and they'd expanded a little bit, those fish mouths were wider.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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That's good.... goes right along with the driving on bald tires analogy

I once used that analogy and, at the end of the inspection, the agent asked me to show her where the tire was on the roof. . .

I said something like, "I'm sorry. I didn't mean to say that there *was* a bald tire on the roof. Rather I was trying to explain that the worn shingles were *like* a bald tire in that neither could be relied upon to provide long term service."

Of, course, she just screwed up her face, tilted her head, and said, "huh?"

At that point, the buyer jumped in and helpfully explained, "He was making a simile. You know, like when someone says that you're as dumb as a post, they don't really mean that you're a post, just that you're as dumb as one."

I took that as my cue to thank everyone and get the heck out of there.

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That's good.... goes right along with the driving on bald tires analogy

I once used that analogy and, at the end of the inspection, the agent asked me to show her where the tire was on the roof. . .

I said something like, "I'm sorry. I didn't mean to say that there *was* a bald tire on the roof. Rather I was trying to explain that the worn shingles were *like* a bald tire in that neither could be relied upon to provide long term service."

Of, course, she just screwed up her face, tilted her head, and said, "huh?"

At that point, the buyer jumped in and helpfully explained, "He was making a simile. You know, like when someone says that you're as dumb as a post, they don't really mean that you're a post, just that you're as dumb as one."

I took that as my cue to thank everyone and get the heck out of there.

I don't get it. Is she or isn't she a post?

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That's good.... goes right along with the driving on bald tires analogy

I once used that analogy and, at the end of the inspection, the agent asked me to show her where the tire was on the roof. . .

I said something like, "I'm sorry. I didn't mean to say that there *was* a bald tire on the roof. Rather I was trying to explain that the worn shingles were *like* a bald tire in that neither could be relied upon to provide long term service."

Of, course, she just screwed up her face, tilted her head, and said, "huh?"

At that point, the buyer jumped in and helpfully explained, "He was making a simile. You know, like when someone says that you're as dumb as a post, they don't really mean that you're a post, just that you're as dumb as one."

I took that as my cue to thank everyone and get the heck out of there.

I don't get it. Is she or isn't she a post?

Steel or Wood ??

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