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Maybe it's my regional heritage, but I'm tempted to guess that it's for making alcoholic beverages (beer, wine, moonshine?). Why one would be in a train station I don't know, but that's my WAG.

The little drawer pulled out at the bottom is very interesting looking.

Brian G.

Acme's 1817 Model Thingy-Bobber [:P]

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I'm pretty sure it's some sort of heater; the drip pan & pipes look like they're delivering a combustible to the "drawers", or the bottom of a heater. Or, the drawers are the cleanouts for the heater. But, where's the "chimney" vent?

Chad's pretty tight on the mechanical stuff; somehow I think he's getting close.

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Carbide gas generator? I guess Chad's on the same track.

If that's what it is, I've seen one, an in ground unit. It was much bigger than that one, constructed of galvanized steel, and still had the original stenciled labeling on the interior.

I'll look for the pictures, but I'm not too optimistic I'll find them.

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Yeah, Kurt, to amend my previous post, I'm wondering if the drawers didn't have some form of wick and screen similar to the old naptha hand /pocket warmer you can STILL get from Resoration Hardware.

I got four of them a few winters ago and enjoy them on really cold days.

If so, the little trough and delivery tubes with an air gap above would meter the flow and limit the pressure on the fuel.

Now watch it be a popcorn popper or something...

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Yeah,

Water heater was my first guess but then I couldn't figure out why a water heater would need those guide rods extending up from the unit. Then I thought maybe it was some kind of fruit or apple/fruit press/cooker but I couldn't reconcile what look like ash trays in the bottom or what looks like drip lines. Come-on Bill, you're killin' us!

OT - OF!!!

M.

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chad, i think we are right, except it would have to use the carbide in dry form and add water. the acid route would screw things up. likely was used to power platform lights (gas). it would be really cool if they stored the gas in sawdust and pressurized it.

i am really just guessing, but at least i am in good company - Chad!

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Bill's having a blast...

Heck, I'm having a blast...

Now, the only way I can see anything going up those tubes from the drawers is via pressure which would require tight sealing doors in front of the drawers (and there are flanges to either side of the drawer slots that may hold the missing doors...) but even then, the trough atop the tubes doesn't have a lid. It seems undeniable that whatever travels the tubes goes down to the trays. And the only reason I can see for the air gap between the twin tubes over the trough is to meter the flow and alleviate pressure from the reservoir above (assuming that there was one.)

Gee, Bill, when you give us the answer to this one, you must do another.

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You know, it 'sort' of reminds me of the drip heaters we had in the army. You fueled 'em up with gasoline and then let the gas drip down into a little combustion chamber where it would burn one drop at a time. We'd huddle around the darned things in the cold.

A railroad platform heater? A heater for farm hands in the fields? A smudge pot to prevent frost in orchards?

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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