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does his lender require a "formal inspection"?

My first, second and third houses were not inspected by professionals. When I was 20 my dad came and looked a my first house with me, the second one I bought from my dad when I was 24 and the third my brother "the contractor" and I "inspected" when I was 27. LUCKILY none of those came back to bite me in the butt!

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I'd do it. Heck, you can really relax about the small stuff since you're highly unlikely to be sued. Shoot, you could even do a scaled down report just on the fewer more significant items.

Maryland SOP allows a partial inspection as long as you report on at least two categories.

I'm not sure about your SOP though.

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This was just discussed on one of the Linked in forums. Some guys thought there could be trouble if the seller decided he didn't want to give the deposit $$ back. The seller could say you are biased, because you are, but you are always biased in favour of your client, I think?

If the lenders require an inspection you might want to check with them.

If you think there might be trouble, allow some time for another inspector to get in there. Otherwise, I'd go ahead and do the inspection. Maybe I'd just go as the dad who happened to have a ladder and a light and a camera and a tool bag.

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I'd hire another inspector I trusted.

If I can trust another inspector enough to refer my potential clients to him when I'm booked, I can hire him to do a job for me and trust him to do it as thoroughly as I'd do it.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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I have a large family in my service area, so this happens to me couple of times per year. I usually just attend the inspection with my relative. I have no problem telling my family a particular inspector is a jerk or a dummy so am always comfortable with their work. I have only had one problem with my attendance at an inspection done by another and that was resolved when he was fired at the start.

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I have inspected, formally, for my wife's mother, her sister, and two nephews. I can't say I gave any of them a second thought about ethics or a conflict of interest as I had no intention of doing anything other than my norm. The norm is my comfort zone and everyone gets that, no more and no less. Perhaps if it was a member of my direct family it would be different, but I really doubt that Dudley, my dog, can afford his own place.

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I have inspected, formally, for my wife's mother, her sister, and two nephews. I can't say I gave any of them a second thought about ethics or a conflict of interest as I had no intention of doing anything other than my norm. The norm is my comfort zone and everyone gets that, no more and no less. Perhaps if it was a member of my direct family it would be different, but I really doubt that Dudley, my dog, can afford his own place.

Richard, is Dudley out of sorts? I can't get him to move.

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I have yet to figure out how I would do anything any differently for my relative than for a regular client.

I try to inspect everything as if my mom would be buying the place and I won't be around to help fix it!

How can I do better than that?

It might not be pleasant around the Thanksgiving table if I were to miss something but that is another story.

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I've worked for family. The trick is to not be distracted by all the baggage that comes with the relationship, IE the siblings, in-laws, kids, grandkids that tag along on your take a relative to work day.

If you can do that, your golden. If not, hire an inspector for him and tag along, it might be fun to be baggage.

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I'm afraid this was a bushy tailed rat, AKA grey squirrel. It could have been a red, but the greys out number 'em 10 to 1, or even a black, but for some reason they tend to reside on the north west (I'm far enough south that Canada is no longer to the west, the river isn't) side of the Niagara river.

There is a resort community about 20 miles south of here where the most common rodent infestation is flying squirrel. They absolutely love cathedral ceilings, entering at the soffit vents and exiting through the ridge. At least something follows those silly vent diagrams.

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