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Squirrels - The Need to Gnaw


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Yep,

A growing problem with teenage squirrels - sewer gas huffing and huffing parties. A side effect is the urge to gnaw on the nearest object. The squirrel authorities are concerned and want to get the message out to all squirrel parents that sewer gases contain methane, hydrogen-sulfide and other toxic fumes and that huffing sewer gas can lead to death. The teens aren't listening. In fact, a week ago, three of them under the influence of sewer gas knocked over a walnut cache and overpowered and killed the elderly security squirrel guarding the nuts.

 

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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On 9/16/2019 at 12:28 PM, hausdok said:

Yep,

A growing problem with teenage squirrels - sewer gas huffing and huffing parties. A side effect is the urge to gnaw on the nearest object. The squirrel authorities are concerned and want to get the message out to all squirrel parents that sewer gases contain methane, hydrogen-sulfide and other toxic fumes and that huffing sewer gas can lead to death. The teens aren't listening. In fact, a week ago, three of them under the influence of sewer gas knocked over a walnut cache and overpowered and killed the elderly security squirrel guarding the nuts.

 

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

So Mike, do you have any mushrooms  left?

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4 hours ago, Les said:

every time I see the word "squirrel" in print I think of Kurt M.  He had a thing for squirrels.  Maybe that is why we were friends for soooooooo long. 

 

Where I grew up, the term squirrel could be applied equally to furry gray or brown rodents that nest in trees or to anyone that exhibited odd trashy irrational behavior. Today we usually refer to such folks as meth heads.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Lead acetate has a sweet taste. It's so sweet that it used to be called “sugar of lead.” ... They ate the paint because the paint flakes tasted sweet. That sweetness came from the sugar of lead which failed to transform into basic lead carbonate during the pigment-making process.

 

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On 9/19/2019 at 7:46 AM, Les said:

every time I see the word "squirrel" in print I think of Kurt M.  He had a thing for squirrels.  Maybe that is why we were friends for soooooooo long. 

 

What is Kurt up to these days? I don't see much activity from him here. It looks like his business is perhaps still up and running. He used to be so active here...

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47 minutes ago, mgbinspect said:

What is Kurt up to these days? I don't see much activity from him here. It looks like his business is perhaps still up and running. He used to be so active here...

He wanders the back streets of Evanston constantly seeking new wheels for his shopping cart.  He's a bit beyond semi-retired.

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3 minutes ago, Jerry Simon said:

He wanders the back streets of Evanston constantly seeking new wheels for his shopping cart.  He's a bit beyond semi-retired.

Well, that's a shame. He sure kept things lively around here. Of course, I've been out of the loop for several years myself. The last I knew of Kurt's activities was when he went to China.

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On 9/19/2019 at 6:46 AM, Les said:

every time I see the word "squirrel" in print I think of Kurt M.  He had a thing for squirrels.  Maybe that is why we were friends for soooooooo long. 

 

I had lunch with Kurt recently, he seems to be doing well. 

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 9/24/2019 at 11:01 AM, Les said:

Lead acetate has a sweet taste. It's so sweet that it used to be called “sugar of lead.” ... They ate the paint because the paint flakes tasted sweet. That sweetness came from the sugar of lead which failed to transform into basic lead carbonate during the pigment-making process.

 

What if the lead hasn't been painted.  Why do they gnaw at it then?

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It never tasted sweet to me.

I had a lead stegosaurus that I got at the Peabody Museum when I was a kid. I used to absentmindedly chew on it and it wasn't particularly sweet.  Of course, that was over 50 years ago. I'd be happy to try it again, but the stegosaurus is long gone and the only pure lead that might be nearby would be the sinkers in my tackle box - and I can't find it at the moment. 

 

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