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Fine trim work


Les
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From the photo I can't determine if the pieces would be more prone to falling than any other trim. In my opinion, if you believe it is likely to fall, then I would do as you did and report it. If you felt it was just so poor an install that you had to say something even thought it may be secure, then I would say something like it is secure, but ..... and then politely say what is really on your mind when you saw that.

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I did not write it. The real question is the inspector response to the question "How much will it cost to fix?"

You're not fixing that.

It will all have to come down and be replaced to get it right. The whole room.

Even if you're lucky enough to be able to come up with a matching pattern, when you take the two sides in the picture down, you not only have to match them, you also have to get real lucky in matching the other corners that may also be butchered.

If it was paint grade, you might get away with caulking your way out of the corners left in place. Too much effort.

The short added piece on the left side, should be at least four foot in length where it meets the longer to allow for movement that can open the miter. And, it looks better.

FWIW; The miter at the split should be at better than a butt joint and at anything less than the 45 degree angle most homeowners and hack trim guys commonly use for splits in crown or baseboard. I prefer 15 degrees or wherever the saw locks when I turn the base. it fits better with no fighting and looks better than a mismatched 45.

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What an inglorious end to a life of stresses;wind and competitive trees.

200 years of struggle. Ended. A minute of chips.

Strained wood resists. Cracks. Surrender.

Horizontal.

Tree-blood drips from the cambium. Unaware of death.

Phloem flowing. Guttae . Surprised drops dropping.

No longer defy the pull of gravity. The fresh cut glistens.

Dreams of tree-top leaves now dashed.

Heat. Desiccant. Dry dust. An odd square edge.

Stacked in layers. Horizontal now. Forever. Sunlight a memory.

All gone but the flesh. The memory of life in the grain.

Annular rings, quartersawn, opalescent under stain.

Beauty ignored. Beauty obscured. Ham-fisted jerk.

Hack.

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What an inglorious end to a life of stresses;wind and competitive trees.

200 years of struggle. Ended. A minute of chips.

Strained wood resists. Cracks. Surrender.

Horizontal.

Tree-blood drips from the cambium. Unaware of death.

Phloem flowing. Guttae . Surprised drops dropping.

No longer defy the pull of gravity. The fresh cut glistens.

Dreams of tree-top leaves now dashed.

Heat. Desiccant. Dry dust. An odd square edge.

Stacked in layers. Horizontal now. Forever. Sunlight a memory.

All gone but the flesh. The memory of life in the grain.

Annular rings, quartersawn, opalescent under stain.

Beauty ignored. Beauty obscured. Ham-fisted jerk.

Hack.

That was beautiful, Chad.

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Fabry waxes poetic. I just watched the film about Ginsberg's "Howl" recently.

Something like, "I've seen the best craftsmen of my generation destroyed by madness..."

Hey Gary, that corner is 'sposed to be "coped" against a butted piece, no?

Les, I have before written with derision of "sloppiness" exhibited in work, and have noted that it does not bode well for whatever other work performance there may be, especially the unseeable kind.

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Hey Gary, that corner is 'sposed to be "coped" against a butted piece, no?

Hi Jim,

That really depends on who's putting it up.

I don't cope crown. Some guys like to. The bigger the crown the harder it is to cope.

When you get into 12 inch maple like in this school cafeteria I did, you'd need a sawzall and a trained beaver for the back cut.

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tn_201425111952_MARCELLUS1.jpg

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"...12 inch maple like in this school cafeteria..."

Geeez, what a school building. Could not have been public, down here the public and private all look like Soviet camps.

Never did like crown myself. Once, 30+ yrs ago, working for a painting contractor working for a house flipper doing an "upgrade", I installed a room full of crown plus dentil upside down. Contractor raised hell but when job was over he thought I had changed it, but I never did. He could not even tell himself that I had not. LOL.

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Geeez, what a school building. Could not have been public, down here the public and private all look like Soviet camps.

That is in fact a public school. Forget about the wood work. That's nothing compared to the floor.

That's a real deal, old school, seam welded, linoleum floor. It was quite a treat to be working in the same room while that was being installed.

It took about a month.

Kurt, I have a Bosch jig saw and plenty of down stroke blades.

For me, it's not worth the effort or extra time. It only takes one stinking little chip out of it, to ruin it.

There's got to be a guy somewhere, trying to invent a GOOD tool for coping. Until then, time is money and if you make your joints right, it doesn't matter how you got there.

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. . . There's got to be a guy somewhere, trying to invent a GOOD tool for coping. . .

There's an excellent one. It works like those machines that duplicate keys. Pretty slick.

I was never particularly good with a coping saw. I'd cope freehand on a portable table saw. However, I worked with a guy who did it the old-school way with a regular coping saw. He could cope a complex section of crown in less than 30 seconds and it would be perfect. He was much faster with his hand saw than I was on the table saw.

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I was never particularly good with a coping saw. I'd cope freehand on a portable table saw. However, I worked with a guy who did it the old-school way with a regular coping saw. He could cope a complex section of crown in less than 30 seconds and it would be perfect. He was much faster with his hand saw than I was on the table saw.

Believe it or not, I learned to install crown molding from my mother-in-law and (her wife) my other-in-law. They cope freehand with a coping saw and do a damned fine job of it, too. They're not 30-seconds fast, but they're fast and they're good. And now my house has crown molding.

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