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I'm 54 years old and can feel the effects of age.  Mainly on the physical side of things and not constantly but my legs feel tired sometimes.  I'm beginning to think its time (past time actually) to pay close attention to my health condition if I want to keep inspecting homes as I transition into the golden years.  

How do you older guys feel?  At what age would you anticipate ceasing to do actual inspections?  Of course this is considering you remain blessed with relatively decent health.

My situation is that I've enjoyed life which included spending money.  Money that I probably should have put into a retirement fund. Thus, I must continue to work.  At least as long as I can stay safe and provide good service to clients.  I'm hoping to continue to maybe age 70.  What are some complications I might expect to face?

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I am seventy-three.  work every day.  never worked nights or week-ends and only have done one sunday inspection in last 35yrs.

I have been shot five times, thrown off tall buildings, and chased by irate husbands and managed to thrive for many decades.  I smoked 2 1/2 packs of Camels everyday for forty-seven years.  Damn near killed me when I quit.  Well it damn near killed me before I quit!

I slowed down at 68yrs (heart attack), but did not stop working.  I think that was the right choice for me.  I really believe we, as inspectors, fail to properly address the stress in our work life.  Stress management is key.  I accomplished that with a strict and rigid schedule.   Yoga may also have been a good choice.

 

waiting to see what other ancient ones write. 

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7 hours ago, Les said:

I am seventy-three.  work every day.  never worked nights or week-ends and only have done one sunday inspection in last 35yrs.

waiting to see what other ancient ones write. 

Kurt M is like 78 or 79; waiting to hear his comments. . .

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Kurt's more like 62, 'bout the same as I.

I'm feeling it for sure but I'm still a long way from slowing down on inspections.  It keeps me young I think.

I'll have to be forced into retirement, won't voluntarily quit for as long as I still need to eat.

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1+ on the stress management. I find driving to get there before the realtor with the key, mustn't keep them waiting, most stressful. I envy you guys that get the Supra key.

I recommend finding a doctor and having a blood test. That way you know if cholesterol is building up in your arteries. I never dreamed I had that problem at 165 lbs, but my arteries were clogging up. Now I take a daily pill, like detergent oil in your engine.

My least stressful occupation was forestry technician. I'd drive around with maps and hike about 8 km (5 miles) over rough terrain in the clear mountain air, 5 days a week.

Born in 1950, so am 67 in 2017. Left-handed but my right is stronger for hard labor. Pretty much retired from the stress racket, and working on my bucket list before it springs a leak. [:D]

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67 for me and I've slowed down a lot in the past year or two. Save for being a T1D (Type One Diabetic) since 1967 my health is very good.  Just can't do or keep up the pace I used to maintain.

Like Erby I have similar comments:  "I'm happy as a clam, I woke up on the green side of the grass ... and everything after that is a gift."

I am winding down the inspection career and that might occur in about two+ years.

 

 

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I turn 69 in November.  Glad to see the yoga fans chiming in.  I have been practicing for over 35 years, and my back has never been stronger or more flexible.  Every few years I will attend a class for a few weeks.  I like most of my teachers but not all of them.  Currently am on zero meds,  except for the occasional IPA.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I do an extreme yoga program daily.  I'm younger (40), but have a lot of miles on my body from farm work until I was 35.  The yoga has helped with flexibility and some of my older aches and pains from overuse have improved or vanished.  The yoga is low impact.  I like it and plan to continue.

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I'm 57. I was super involved with martial arts for a long time- I banked on the flexibility and strength I attained for a long time after that. Three months ago I realized I couldn't get by on what I used to do any longer. I joined a cross-fit style gym. I'm by far the oldest, almost the slowest and there are more than a few women who can clean and jerk more than me.

Still, I'm much stronger and leaner than I was and it's fun enough so that I actually look forward to the 6 AM class 3x a week.

I'm working hard at getting my stretch back- when I was 40, I could just drop to a front/ rear split and tuck my chin behind my knees with straight legs.

It feels good to work at fitness again.

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Surprised to see the numbers of guys doing yoga. This is a totally foreign subject to me and wonder how one would begin? Turning 60 this fall and I have always been strong but not flexible, even as a kid. A gradual start I assume but can't see myself at the local y.

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It's low impact.  I'm sure you can find some yoga classes around you somewhere.  Or just get a yoga vide or Wii Fit console with the yoga program on it and do it yourself (less embarrassing and can be done when you want to without a bunch of others watching you struggle).

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I've found yoga to be quite injurious sometimes so what little I do now is always after my run when I'm thoroughly warmed up, followed by 3 or 4 weightlifting movements.  That's 3 miles every third day,weather and health permitting.  I would have exited this profession about 5 years ago because of memory problems if I hadn't started running.

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I have a yoga DVD set and streaming internet service.  Pick a workout and do it.  Start small, then move up.  The program that I use offers everything from 20 minute beginner to 65 minute brutal advanced workouts.  I do the 65 minute workout at least once a week, but that's after years of practice.  My flexibility has greatly improved.  I have a farming background, so I've always been a strong guy, but I've gained strength in different muscles with this program.  It's helped me get into a few attics that my customers thought NOBODY could get in.

Anyway, pick yoga or cross fit like Chad or something else of your choice and do it.  That's the most important thing.  Be active.

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...besides the strength and flexibility regimens there are also the balance and movement ones, like qi gong and all the forms of tai chi.  They are very low impact for the most part, but very beneficial.  Past a certain age the biggest danger to anyone's health is injury from falls. A teacher of mine who is also a physician said that the brain builds neural pathways every time the balance is challenged, and to keep those pathways operating there has to be some kind of practice going on.

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I'm 51 and will run my first half marathon this Sunday in Chicago.  I've been a runner off and on for the past 20 years, but it was not until last year that I decided to take it to another level.  I'll begin training for a full marathon next week.  

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  • 3 weeks later...

51, been active my whole life. Been hit by a car, blown to the ground, tossed from a roof, fell off a few rock walls, and generally been abused in various manners by falling equipment and crashing vehicles. I have a list of pains that I ignore, and a few special ones I don't.

My worst injury, in terms of incapacitatation,  was a blown C6-C7 disc in my neck that left me partially paralyzed down my left arm. I recovered without surgery, but I maintain my disc health with regular range-of-motion and cervical traction. It is necessary as I lift quite a bit of awkward equipment every day.

I find that my little secret to health is keeping moving, eating well and giving my body time to rest, and rest WELL. You have to feed the thing and give it time to recover from normal and abnormal stresses. If you don't, you'll be less than whatever your best could be. If your work is your "exercise", then don't overdo it to the point where you can't recover overnight. Wear and tear are real.

I think how we "feel" is important, but it should be linked to our capabilities. Together, they tell you where you are, and where you might need to be.

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